Cold Hands, Cold Feet

It is reported that February is the coldest month in the UK and it is Raynaud’s Awareness Month.

Their aim is to highlight the problems associated with Raynaud’s that are estimated to affect over 10 million people in the UK – that is 1 in 6.

You can read more and how it can affect anyone including young children – http://www.raynauds.org.uk

Up to 20% of the worldwide population suffer with Raynaud’s, which is a condition that affects the blood supply to certain parts of the body, mainly hands, feet, fingers and toes. People with Raynaud’s also experience tingling, numbness and pain, which can last from seconds to hours.

They are saying that this condition has a real impact on daily life and everyday activities and there is no cure.

Many people suffer with cold hands and cold feet and just put up with it. You feel miserable and moaning about it changes nothing.

Just Google it and the Internet doctor says it means nothing as it is not a medical condition so it cannot be treated with anything.

This confirms – put up with it.

Having suffered with cold hands and cold feet for over 40 years and no amount of wearing woolly gloves and socks made any difference. I knew it had something to do with my blood vessels but with nothing out there offering me any relief, I just put up with it like everyone else.

Are our cold hands and feet telling us something about the way we are choosing to live?

• Could it be possible that the way we are living has something to do with it?

• Could it be possible that our daily choices of how we live are not supporting our body?

• Could it be possible that our immune system is not working at optimum level?

• Could it be possible that our lack of sleep has something to do with this problem?

• Could it be possible that our food choices are adding to this issue?

• Could it be possible that we are not truly keeping our body warm, as it needs to be?

• Could it be possible that simple lifestyle changes could turn our cold hands and feet into warm toasty fingers and toes forever?

Well in my case it worked, after I applied some common sense medicine like –

• Waking up and drinking hot water every day, even in the summer
• Cutting out gluten and dairy from my diet
• Eating hot soup most days
• Going to bed early every day
• Going for a walk most days but not in the snow
• Wearing layers always, not concerned about fashion
• Hat on and not worried about what others might think
• Gloves on even for a short distance
• Being sensible about wrapping up – so if the sun was shining but the weather was actually 6 degrees, I made sure I was wrapped up well

I know going to bed early every single day has helped to build my immune system and then making sensible choices to deeply take care of my body was easy and not hard work.

It is hard to believe that I have super warm hands and feet now and I wonder if I did have Raynauds’ but with no awareness that there was such a thing, I just accepted it.

Could it be possible that if we started paying close attention to our body and applying some ‘common sense medicine’ we could benefit in the long term and that means happy hands and toasty toes forever?

Possible?

 

Raynaud’s Awareness Month – #loveyourgloves

Share
Share On Facebook
Share On Twitter
Share On Google Plus
Share On Linkedin
Contact us

Comments 47

  1. Thank you, Bina. This is a wonderful, inspiring example of the truth that how we live is our real medicine. Your experience with Raynaud’s also highlights the fact that there is a wisdom about the body and wellbeing available that mainstream medicine would benefit from examining.

    1. That wisdom you talk about Raja is something grand I would say. Our body has its own intelligence and it is our job to take care of it so that it supports us. Think about it we have this body from day dot until our last breath. The in between stuff is the medicine so to speak. So give it good medicine like going to bed early and drinking hot water every morning and you got a fat chance things are not going to be cold and frosty in that body of yours.
      I have a colleague who is medically trained, who has been suffering from Raynaud’s for decades and when I mentioned the blog they said great but that they have no time to read it as they are too busy. This is interesting how we are intelligent academically but when it comes to doing something that perhaps may support the body it is another response which to me is not really intelligent.

      1. It is so interesting to frame going to bed early and drinking hot water and the like as ‘good medicine’. It really drives home that the state of our bodies is our own responsibility, not the doctor’s and that there is so much we can do to support ourselves if we choose to. The other thing that comes through loud and clear here is consistency. What I’m hearing is that you didn’t just wear gloves some times or drink hot water on some days, but that you did it consistently and that’s what brought the results: like how water can wear away stone…

        1. Reflecting on this more, I’m also seeing from this blog and the comments how important the details are. If we ignore the little things then we shouldn’t be surprised when a bigger problem comes in. I remember an army guy once telling me they get taught in the army not to ignore it when you feel a pinch in your army boots. If you have a long distance to travel by foot, catching that niggling pinch in your boots early and taking the time to pause and sort it out (a wrinkled sock, a too tight lace etc.) stops the blisters forming which stops the infection which stops the drama and incapacitation etc. that could come. They saw it as their responsibility to themselves but also to each other to take care of event the smallest things – if you ignore a blister forming you’re risking the safety of the group. So I’m hearing this loud and clear reading this blog – take care of the smallest things, don’t wait, don’t override.

  2. The cold hands and cold feet should definitely be classed as a medical condition and not just put up with. A couple of years ago I started to become aware of this cold feeling in my hands and feet and feeling very disturbed about it, I cared about myself less and thoughts of self-critisum were at the fore. But when my hands and feet where warm and toasty there was none of that and as you say was a direct result of the choices to care for myself more. Now when my hands are cold that is a big alarm bell and even more now – how stiff are my hands and toes? if they are clenched or tight to bend and flex something is not right. Our hands and toes can tell us so much!

    1. Whilst I agree it should be classed as a medical condition Leigh, we currently have so many ‘medical conditions’ which of course are rising that this is seen as minor yet to the sufferer it is a miserable thing every day.
      The awareness campaign is about wearing woolly gloves which of course is a step in the right direction but to be honest that is not going to give lasting real changes and digging deeper and going inside may just be the answer as it was in my case.
      This common sense Simple Living medicine should be offered on their website so it can give people an option that may just change things for the better.

      1. I understand what you are saying here Bina. Even if someone is given a medical diagnosis for cold hands and cold feet it won’t necessarily make a difference if the internal factors about the way that we are living are left unaddressed.

        1. Correct Shevon this is the point. We get the medical diagnosis and then take the advice, pill, surgery or whatever action is needed to get rid of the ‘ill’ so to speak. What is missing is taking a stop and pause moment and actually asking “could it be possible that how I am living, maybe contributing to this ‘ill’ which is a ‘dis-ease’ in my body?”
          I feel it is only when we make that stop and ask the question can we really get underneath and at least begin the ball rolling in the right direction. At this time what is needed is a big fat dose of honesty. Nothing like real raw uncut honesty to get things moving.

  3. I love this blog and it was very timely as I was just contemplating how I used to have cold hands and feet all the time for years and years but haven’t as much in the past year.

    As you write in this blog, Bina, I definitely ‘got used to it’, or more truthfully became numb to it as most of the time I would not notice the ice cubes attached to my appendages. But there came a time when I did start to notice it again and the more I did, the more uncomfortable it was, until one day I decided enough was enough. I started dressing in layers more often, drinking hot water every day – no more ice in my water at all, turning up the heat in our house in the winter, eating hot foods more often. It made a huge difference and I no longer put up with cold hands and feet.

    It may seem like a small thing, but it’s definitely a sign of how well we take care of our bodies in general.

  4. Great comment Julie and the fact you done something when things got uncomfortable says a lot really. I agree just small things can make such a big difference and this wearing layers business is super important. In UK yesterday morning we had -3 degrees first thing but the sun was shining. You would be surprised what people were wearing at the train station on their way to work. Whilst I understand that they have super warm offices, we cannot ignore the fact that the trains are delayed more often than not, which means extra time on the station platform. Just this 10 mins of freezing cold conditions means our body has to deal with our choice of not dressing appropriately.
    If we are not bothering to dress to support our body, what other choices are we making that are equally not supporting our body?

    1. Great question Bina,
      “If we are not bothering to dress to support our body, what other choices are we making that are equally not supporting our body?”

      I have been deeply inspired by the vitality, purpose and sparkle with which you live your life Bina and your solid commitment to self care has had me asking myself questions like this one. And the honesty that has come from that asking has helped me to change my life.

      1. Thank you Jo for confirming my ‘solid commitment to self care’. So that to me makes sense why it is easy for me to write about self care as I live a certain quality everyday without compromise. What that means for this particular blog topic is feeling cold is addressed. I never ignore it and it would be unthinkeable not to wear layers or take gloves out on a cold day.
        Double socks is my normal and those who know me will tell you as many laugh at me and I don’t care. Imagine suffering for all those years to where I am today sharing about how it could be possible that lifestyle changes is all we actually need to deal with some of these things in our life that make us miserable. Lets face it when we feel cold, we cannot relax as our body is tense and hard from the cold.

  5. I love that you have warm hands and feet now. A true testament that when we make changes to the way we are living things change in our body – and that the symptoms we get e.g. cold hands are our body telling us something. I know if I get cold feet now, unless I have been careless and not put warm footwear/socks on, that my circulation is affected and that I need to look at the way I am living and the way I am moving. They soon warm up when I make changes.

    1. Your comment just reminded me Jane of how miserable I was with my cold hands and cold feet and putting up with it was the only choice I thought I had and how wrong I was.
      The thing is I never ever get cold hands or cold feet now as I have really and truly got to grips with making sure I always wear layers and have my hat and gloves with me.
      Wearing two pairs of socks has been my normal for almost a decade now and I recall a friend laughing at me in the summer as I had tights on. I didn’t care, it is what it is and it works for me. I feel the cold more than others at times and I never use the temperature or a date on a calendar to tell me the weather that is inside my body. I know how to take deep care of my body and keeping warm is my normal.

      1. I had no idea until I read this blog that I may have Raynaud’s syndrome and by the definition I had it full tilt. It got so bad that often the only thing that would warm me was a hot water soak; it seemed pointless to put 3 pairs of wooly sox on ice cube feet; at that point it did not help… and so I often ignored it. For the past few years I have been developing a consistency of self care as offered by the role model I chose, Bina Pattel, and this has not only reversed my depression, pulled me out of poverty and given me my life back but my hands and feet do not go cold as often nor for as long. I do feel it has to do with how much self neglect I’ve been in and that my body is talking to me; it is saying it wants Love ‘All of the time’, not just when its easy.

        I appreciate you showing just how simple it can be to address our dis-comfort and even our dis-eases by applying self care, using self love and the common sense that comes with it.

        1. This is the thing Jo Billings – we can address our dis-comfort with very simple and practical ways. By applying self-care as you say is common sense really and it makes a big difference if we stick at it no matter what. If you knew me in the past, I was a constant moaner about my cold hands and cold feet and now both are super warm ALL the time and that speaks volumes.
          When something like this works in our life, I feel we have a duty to share this as others can benefit and not stay in the agony and misery. This website is saying there is another way to live and it will continue to post blogs that make sense and ask the reader to question things and ponder on things that they may not have done before.

      2. I agree – I love taking extra care to have warm clothes on, so I feel warm inside and out, I love feeling warm, and tender. When Im cool or cold my body hardens to protect itself and I don’t feel so relaxed then.

        1. Good point you make here Jane about the body and how it hardens when we are cold to protect itself. This hardening affects our insides probably more than we would like to think. So we contract so to speak and when we are warm and toasty we are expanded.

  6. Thank you Cheryl for your feedback. Great you can feel this website is refreshing and we plan to deliver and present a lot more ‘fresh air’ which we feel is much needed.
    Everyone seems to be super busy and we fast read so if things like this blog make sense and it took you 5 minutes to read then we got a chance to say what we need without overdoing it.
    That thing you say about ‘fear of looking silly’ was also me in the fashionista days where looking cool and feeling crap was the normal. Gone are those days and last summer a woman questioned me at the bus stop and asked why I was wearing gloves as it was not winter. I told her that my hands like to be warm ALL the time and as it was cold regardless of the date on the calendar saying it was not winter, I was simply looking after myself. What amazes me today is that my hands and feet are super warm all the time. I wear sheepskin insoles in all my shoes all the time. Hello – you probably think I have lost the plot but no, it works for me and my feet love it.

  7. So true that the changes only need to be simple and consistent to make a difference. And how much the body loves being warm! I’ve had Raynaud’s for years and last winter I felt the cold all the time ,but since I’ve started making really simple, small changes to look after myself, this winter I’ve barely noticed the cold: to me this is amazing! When I dress for winter, or the cold, I resist it less – so there’s less tension in my body as a result. Thank you for this reminder of practical and no-nonsense top tips.

    1. Great that you like the practical no-nonsense top tips Bryony. Our aim on this website is simply to say it as it is with nothing fancy and zero fluff.
      I agree with you about less tension in our body when we are warm. It seems obvious whilst writing this now but like many others, I would like to look cool and trendy than wear hat, gloves or socks. Now I don’t care who thinks what of me, I take the responsibility to keep warm no matter what. For me it is a priority as if my body is cold then I am going to be miserable. Knowing I have the choice to change that misery state is empowering to say the least.

  8. I feel you are right Bina, our lifestyle, the way we live everyday, definitely has an affect on how our body feels. From someone who was under the illusion that the cold didn’t bother me, from going out in shorts in temperatures of 0-5 degrees to having made a lot of changes in my daily living, like cutting out dairy, alcohol, gluten, caffeine and sugar and being more self-loving towards myself, I am now much more aware of how my body is feeling and when I feel cold I dont go into disregard and just ignore it, I make sure I wrap up. Making those daily changes in taking more care of myself has made an incredible difference in my life and also how I interact with others. Because I am more loving with myself I feel I am more loving with others too.

    1. This is a great comment Tim and what I keep feeling to ask the world is –
      why is it that we go out in shorts when the temperature is 5 degrees or less?
      I was the same for nightclubs – very little clothing and yes I felt the cold but then had the solution – drink alcohol which definately numbed my feelings and so I forgot about the cold and ignored it when I saw my skin turning blue and purple in colour.
      I also like what you share Tim about being more caring and loving towards yourself everyday has made a difference in how you interact with others. I feel it also makes us understand others as we were there once and now we know different. This is why we ALL need to share our own lived experience so others get a taste, a flavour of what they could have too and it comes down to choice. Always a choice.

  9. So why is it that we just rely on the medics to tell us. In this case what you confirm Michael is that there is no cure, yet I am living proof having been a super cold hands and cold feet sufferer for most of my life to warm and toasty hands and feet.
    Could it be that we need to take it into our own hands and make self caring and deeply loving choices, which are lifestyle choices and nothing more and things will change. Well it did in my case and this is why this blog has come about. Total simple sense if you ask me.

  10. I love my gloves and thermal insoles and it takes me well into May , closer to June sometimes, for me to stop wearing my thermals, I don’t like being cold either. And I do find a walk really gets my hands and feet toasty warm.
    Quite remarkable really that a condition that is medically is seen with no cure was resolved with something so simple and enjoyable as taking loving care of yourself consistently on a daily basis. Clearly this is the key to bringing about true and lasting healing.
    This blog makes so much sense and gives an easy to do list for such change.

    1. Great point you make Ruth Ketnor about how we give our power away to the medics when some common sense stuff may just help. Of course it is advisable to always seek professional medical help but if there is a strong consensus that there is no cure, surely we don’t just give up.
      Could it be possible that the way we are choosing to live – in other words our lifestyle choices have a play in how things manifest in our body?
      Would it be true to say that we actually have lifestyle illnesses today that were not around in the past?

  11. This blog is VERY sensible and practical and makes much more sense that the saying ‘Cold hands, Warm heart. I used to get colds all of the time and my hands were well known to be cold. Now I am more aware that when my hands are cold, I am neglecting myself in someway, whether it be not wearing enough clothes, not putting my gloves on or even that it’s time for me to have something to eat. Our bodies are always communicating to us and it is amazing what we can learn about ourselves and our bodies when we pay attention.

    1. Correct Shevon – our bodies are always communicating to us and there is much to learn if we choose to connect to our body and respond as you say in your comment.
      Our health systems are so burdened and is it time we took more responsibility by even asking a simple question like you say that if your hands are cold, could it be possible you are neglecting your body in some way?

  12. When our iron levels are low a common symptom are cold hands and feet. If we were to apply the ‘common sense medicine’ that the author of this blog writes, with from their lived experience, could our iron stores then improve if we made lifestyle changes beyond our diet? Epigenetics tells us that our environment can have an impact on our health, even if we are medically predisposed to a condition.

    1. Hello Shevon
      this is a great comment and from personal experience as the author of this blog I can say that I no longer have low iron levels.
      So many of us find remedies, drinks and pop pills to support us with something that our body is lacking like iron. But what if we made some changes that are ‘common sense medicine’.
      I also noticed how advertisements encourage us to take the iron drink but not address why we have the problem in the first place.
      It begs the questions, who actually benefits and is it all about making profits?
      What is clear is finding solutions to continue functioning is never going to clear the root issue.

  13. I like this comment ‘common sense medicine,’ – I feel is lacking every time our bodies are signalling that something isn’t right. It is so simple yet we go to the quick fixes, popping pills and potions. If the author of the blog was able to heal from Raynauds, then what else are we capable of healing if we paid more attention to the signals of the body?

    On a side note, I observe people treat their cars with more care than their bodies, this is a wake up call, is a car more important then their body? Where is the responsibility?

    It is lovely confirmation that the author has healed from this condition, thank you for sharing Simple Living Global – what else are we capable of doing?

  14. After bringing my attention and lots of care to my cold hands, I have noticed something. If my WRISTS are warm, my hands are warm and I am warm. So now I’m taking great care of my wrists too. So simple.

  15. I was just in California and my work colleagues were teasing me for being wrapped up like it was winter. Well for me it WAS winter. It was 11 degrees C and that is not warm for me, however brightly the California sun might be shining. It was interesting to see them thinking twice about their choice of clothes after seeing me wrapped up.

    1. I was at the bus stop yesterday and saw a young woman absolutely shaking with cold and it was simply because it was what I call the ‘Cold Sun’. Yes it was bright and shiny but at 8am it was really cold.
      What I noticed was the fashionista takes priority before keeping warm and toasty.
      You tend to not look fancy and flashy with the hat and gloves with a big coat but surely it is worth it.

      I am known for wearing layers even when the world and its brothers think it is super hot out there.
      Knowing how bad my cold hands and feet were, where I knew it was literally pain in my bones – to being warm and constantly maintaining that, is priceless to say the least.

  16. Bed socks are a must for me and I’ve taken to heating them up on an electric oil heater before bed. The way they feel when I put them on is amazing. I describe it to my kids as a foot hug. Cold feet or no, who wouldn’t want that? It’s so awesome my husband is embracing it.

    Last night I was a little late home and I didn’t do the heating up thing. I was shivery when I got into bed and I can feel my toes cold this morning. It’s a small detail, but I can feel the impact on my body of missing it. Like my body wants and needs me to take care of it and feels the absence when I don’t.

  17. Thank you Simple Living Global for bringing Raynaud’s disease into our awareness and for sharing your lived wisdom here, on how we can practically deal with cold hands and cold feet.

    Before this blog I never even knew that Raynaud’s existed and it is a very serious disease which sometimes has to be treated with medications like calcium channel blockers, alpha blockers, prescription skin cream and ACE inhibitors. Some of these medications are used to treat high blood pressure.

    Gangrene can also set in which can lead to toes and fingers actually being amputated.

    https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/raynaud/treatment

  18. I have recently been seeing a bit of London sunshine which is certainly not hot weather but people somehow switch clothes and think it is.
    6 degrees is not flip flops and shorts and we forget how warm our body actually needs to be for optimum well being.

    Out for a walk with a friend this week, we had hat and gloves on and possibly looked odd to the outside world. All I know is that I was super snuggy and warm and there was not a slight temperature change to my body when I stepped outside.

    The other thing I have been noticing is how children are dressed for fashion and not for keeping the tootsies and hands warm.

  19. I have long limbs and circulation problems supposedly ‘run in my family’.

    HOWEVER, I’ve realised that for me, having cold hands and feet is not about those things – it is directly linked to how well I take (or don’t) care of myself.

    I noticed this a few years back and have watched and experimented with it since. I inadvertently confirmed it again this last week.

    A particularly full on time at work, culminated in a huge working week. My morning and evening routines lost some of their care and colour. I was rushing around. I made bad food choices. I ate close to bedtime. I dropped some of my walks. I didn’t drink enough water. I ditched my pop socks, telling myself it was sunny.

    And guess what? Yep: cold hands, cold feet.

    So then came the re-set.

    Warm clothes. Hot soup. Taking care of the details again. And bingo. Warm hands, warm feet.

    And it’s not even sunny outside.

    1. I have been feeling again how this is all about the details.

      I remember as a child joking with my Dad that he wouldn’t step outside without being fully buttoned, zipped and rugged up. We would all have to wait for him to fully zip his jacket and put on his scarf, even if we were in a rush. It seemed to take ages.

      I have realised the sense in his approach and how much self-care there was there.

      It’s reminded me that putting on my gloves on the way to the station or doing my coat up after I’ve stepped outside is not where it’s at.

      I can go even further with the details.

  20. Today in London is one of the coldest days of the year yet you see people with thin clothing on shivering.

    I always wear layers.
    The author of this blog showed me a few years ago the importance of wearing layers underneath clothing.
    I wear them all year round and it does keep my kidneys and lower back warm.

    As I look after my body, I notice how sensitive I am to the cold. Even when I am driving I keep warm.

    A detailed blog that we should pay attention to.

  21. Thank you for this wise and insightful blog. It’s so inspiring to learn how, through a daily commitment to doing that which works for your body consistently, you turned around this chronic condition of having cold hands and cold feet by giving your body the support it required to allow it to heal itself.

    So, through your Living example, Bina, we can see that there is a wisdom available in the body, which will respond when we accept the truth that the way we live on a daily basis is indeed a form of medicine which can heal us.

    At a time when the world is plagued by the high incidence of so many of what’s called “lifestyle diseases” such as obesity, diabetes and lung cancer, surely it is high time that we accepted that if our lifestyle contributes to the creation of disease, then a different way of living, new choices, can help us prevent and heal disease. The crucial thing is, as you say, to be really honest with ourselves now about how we live daily and ask whether we are truly supporting and nurturing ourselves – not wait until the onset of a symptom or a diagnosis of a doctor to tell us we have been heading in the wrong direction.
    Why wait for any damage to be done?

    If living with a true 100% commitment to self-care in all areas of life is real medicine for us, why don’t we all start taking this self-care medicine now?

  22. I was speaking with a friend this week who shared her observations of how she sees people wrapped up warm at the top half of their body e.g with hat, scarf and waist length jacket (notice no mention of gloves!) but it is like we have forgotten about the lower half of our body which is not wrapped up just as warm, especially when it comes to the feet with some of us having no socks or those thin trainer like socks on.

    She is so correct. What I realise is that most of us dress because it is a certain season, but not because we want to keep our bodies warm. Example – we know it is cold outside, as it is winter and so the obligatory – hat, scarf, jacket and maybe gloves come out but that’s about it. As we are not dressing to keep the whole body warm, but dressing to the weather (which is something outside of us) of course we are disconnected from our bodies and so we are not then able to contemplate what each part of our body needs to keep warm as we have lost touch with it.

    This blog I feel is a must read, as it has very valuable tips that can get us taking care of our bodies much more and stop taking them for granted.

  23. It’s pretty cold here right now in London and something I have been observing that feels worth a mention – in the name of fashion I see this trend of ankles on display with those trainer socks and heavy coat. Great, so on some level it has been noted this is winter and it’s cold.

    But what about those ankles – is that our achilles heel (pun intended) when it comes to deeply taking care of ourselves?
    What if the ankles do affect how cold our feet are and how the blood circulates back up to the heart and all around our body?

    I for one, coming from lived experience, can say that it works well to have this part of our body snug warm and what I have noticed is when I step outside, I actually feel no different and no longer whinge at the bus stop to others how cold it is outside. WHY?
    Because I choose to wrap up well and it holds me steady with my internal temperature.

    Call me weird or out of fashion and not cool, but even in warmer weather, I carry a pair of soft light gloves that support me as I tend to feel the elements far more than most and this extra care goes a long way, as I am completely free of any concern now about having cold hands and cold feet. What a great common sense way to heal this stuff once and for all and with no cost. Amazing really.

    1. Ah the cropped trouser – what a great look.

      What has struck me in observing the same thing, Bina, is that it is mostly women wearing the cropped trousers and no socks in the freezing cold. The coat is big and the scarf is bigger, often there are even hats and gloves, but the ankles are bare.

      It is like the cropped trouser is the go-to outfit and so many of us rigidly stick to it, despite the weather.

      I had wondered if this was a UK thing, but it was out in force in New York this last week.

      Especially where there are hip trainers to be showcased.

      I am sure there are some men who do this too, but I see that much less – so as women, why do we care so much about the look?

      Why do we override our body in the name of fashion?

      Who are we trying to impress and is that really more important than being physically warm?

      I love the cropped trouser look, but I can’t now have cold ankles. It acts like a circuit breaker, stopping the warmth from getting to my feet and especially my toes. And it makes the temperature of my whole body drop a few degrees.

      And the opposite is also true – warm ankles equals warm feet, equals warm body, equals a settled body and, in fact, beyond that to a feeling of snuggly joy.

      1. Thank you Jenifer for this comment expanding on what this ankle showing cropped trouser stuff is all about. Fashion in winter cold weather seems silly to me, if it harms our body in anyway.

        I know when those famous snuggy boots were the height of fashion and they are like indoor and outdoor footwear and everyone was wearing them. So many had them on in summer with a mini skirt. So again confirming fashion goes before what the weather says.

        Next – I am known to wear double socks and I have tried the odd times with one layer and I can feel the difference. What I have realised is how over the years I am more connected to my body, so I actually feel more than I did in the past. This means even a draught I can feel on my legs if the front door is open too long and I am inside.

        If I am going outside there is this fun way of getting prepared. I want to feel as warm and well as I do inside my well heated home. It requires layers, a bit of magic as to which layers, then the usual hat gloves and sensible footwear.

        I step outside and cannot feel the difference, even though the temperature could be very cold. Interesting.

        I bought small heaters that are dotted around my home in addition to the main heating for extra boost as and when needed, but also I can heat up my clothes before putting them on. This ritual has been going on for a decade now and life without warm clothes is not happening.

        Of course I am real and so when I am away this is not always possible, but I roll with it and it is no big deal as my reserve hot tank inside me is full of warmth and carries me through nights away from hot house home.

  24. This is a great conversation because something that seems or should be common sense is not always the case. For instance how many times have we nipped to the shops without putting on a coat or nipped next door to a neighbour and stood there freezing on the doorstep? Or even stood at our own doorstep freezing out of politeness.

    These may seem like trivial examples of lack of self-care but when we turn it around and start making choices that support us, these simple acts speak volumes.

  25. In my shoes I have lambs wool insoles.

    I have a coat with gloves attached.

    So when I wear them I don’t get cold hands and feet.

    When I put my socks on I have a ‘sock hug’ to take care of my feet.

    Sometimes I don’t put my slippers on at home so I do get cold feet.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *