World Diabetes Day

by Bina Pattel

Dear World

Since 2007, the United Nations recognises Diabetes as a Global threat and designates November 14th each year as World Diabetes Day, in honour of Frederick Banting’s birthday. (1)

Diabetes is a very common disease, which is rapidly growing. In the past it was a problem of industrialised nations, but today it is fast becoming a global epidemic.

Sir Banting was a medical scientist from Canada who was the first person to use insulin on humans.

So what has changed in the past 9 years since we started World Diabetes Day?

Here are some statistics, which clearly confirm that this disease is on the rise and it most certainly is a ‘global threat’.

Global

There are 422 million adults with diabetes worldwide.
This figure has more than quadrupled since 1980 when it was 108 million. (2)

1 in 2 adults with diabetes is undiagnosed. (3)

Every 6 seconds 1 person dies from diabetes. (3)

5 million deaths from diabetes in 2015. (3)

2014 (2)

These statistics are from a study called ‘Worldwide Trends in Diabetes Since 1980: a Pooled Analysis of 751 Population-Based Studies with 4.4 Million Participants.’ The study was published in The Lancet on 6th April 2016. The research was led by scientists from Imperial College London and involved Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, the World Health Organization and nearly 500 researchers across the world. The study compared diabetes levels among men and women from 1980 to 2014.

The study found –

The cost of diabetes had reached $825 billion International dollars per year. ($825,000,000,000).

This cost includes treating and managing diabetes and its complications including limb amputations. This figure does not include the number of working days lost. If this were included, the cost would be much higher.

Diabetes was highest in Polynesia and Micronesia where 1 in 5 adults had diabetes.

In Nauru and American Samoa, the figures are nearly 1 in 3 men and women.

Half of the 422 million adults with diabetes lived in 5 countries –
Brazil
China
India
USA
Indonesia

Diabetes among men had more than doubled from 4.3% in 1980 to 9% in 2014.

Diabetes in women had increased from 5% in 1980 to 7.9% in 2014.

If current trend continues, over 700 million adults globally will be affected by diabetes in 2025.

USA

2012 (4)

Estimated total direct and indirect cost of diabetes – $245 billion ($245,000,000,000)

2014 (2)

8.2% of men had diabetes.
1980 this was 4.7%. Increase of more than two-thirds.

6.4% women had diabetes.
1980 this was 4.3%.

Canada
2016 (5)

11 million Canadians today have diabetes or pre-diabetes.
Every 3 minutes someone is diagnosed.

UK

2014 – 6.6% of men and 4.9% of women had diabetes. (2)

2016 – 1 person is diagnosed with diabetes every 2 minutes. (6)

2016 – Over 4 million people have diabetes. (7) 

England (8)

5 million people in England are at high risk of developing Type 2 diabetes.

Estimated 1 in 3 people will be obese and 1 in 10 will develop Type 2 diabetes by 2034.

Current estimated budget is £10 billion on diabetes every year.
This is 10% of the NHS budget.

Hello

That is over $12,400,000,000 billion US dollars.

10% of the NHS money is quite a lot. If it continues at the current rate, certainly it will not be sustainable.
Dr. Srikanth Bellary, Clinical Director, Diabetes. (6)

So just in case you don’t know, England is a small part of the UK.

Check out these figures again and this is super serious and no wonder they say diabetes will bankrupt the NHS if we don’t make lifestyle changes now.

Diabetes will have a tremendous burden on our National Health Service, which is probably unaffordable and it will be much cheaper to actually change lifestyle now and prevent people from developing these complications than to try and pay for it through the NHS.
Prof. Timothy Barrett, Birmingham Children’s Hospital (6)

Consider what England could do with a spare £10 billion every year.

Consider if funding was available to inform and educate every single person about diabetes.

Consider the impact on our families, communities and society as a whole if we start to take Responsibility for how we are choosing to live every day.

The total cost associated with diabetes in the UK currently stands at £23.7 billion. (8)

Australia

2 out of every 5 adults will develop Type 2 diabetes in their lifetime. (9)

2015 (10)

280 Australians develop diabetes every day – 1 person every 5 minutes.

Approx. 1.7 million Australians have diabetes. This includes all types of diagnosed diabetes.
1.2 million known and registered and up to 500,000 silent and undiagnosed Type 2 diabetes.

More than 100,000 Australians had developed diabetes in the previous year.

The total annual cost impact of diabetes is $14.6 billion ($14,600,000,000)

March 2016 (11)

By the end of 2017, Type 2 diabetes will be the single biggest burden on Australia’s health system.

Just in case you are not up to date, we had a World Health Day back in April this year (2016) and the topic was Diabetes.
http://simplelivingglobal.com/world-health-day

Our blog back then mentioned a few things about one of our oldest known human diseases, which is also one of the major causes of premature illness and death in most countries.

This speaks volumes if you stop and think about it for a moment.

Next – we have a kingpin on diabetes saying – 

This is the first time we have had such a complete global picture about diabetes – and the data reveals the disease has reached levels that can bankrupt some countries’ health systems.

The enormous cost of this disease, to both governments and individuals could otherwise go towards life essentials such as food and education.

Until we find effective ways of addressing the global obesity epidemic, the key to tackling diabetes crisis is focusing on individuals who are at high risk of the condition.
Professor Majid Ezzati, senior author of ‘Worldwide Trends in Diabetes Since 1980: a Pooled Analysis of 751 Population-Based Studies with 4.4 Million Participants.’ Ezzati is from the School of Public Health at Imperial College London and is an adjunct Professor of Global Health at Harvard Chan School. (2)

The most important risk factor for diabetes is obesity. Yet global obesity levels are soaring out of control.
Goodarz Danaei, co-lead author of ‘Worldwide Trends in Diabetes Since 1980: a Pooled Analysis of 751 Population-Based Studies with 4.4 Million Participants.’
Danaei is an assistant Professor of Global Health at Harvard Chan School. (2)

So here we have the bigwigs on this global study telling us that our health systems are in serious trouble and we need to address our widespread issue on obesity, which is out of control.

Can we agree that we now have enough evidence, statistics and proof that there is a direct link between sugar, obesity and diabetes?

Do we need more research?

What more is there now that we need to prove?
Are we getting any closer to the root cause of diabetes?

WHY is diabetes on the rise?
WHY are our kids getting diabetes at such young ages?
WHY does someone get diabetes in the first place?

WHY are we accepting diabetes like it is some bad luck thing some of us get?
WHY are we using the blame game but not asking if we have a hand in this?

Does diabetes have something to do with how we are choosing to Live?
Is diabetes telling us something more as it has been around since day dot?

We now know it is one of our oldest known diseases and yet no cure.

Why have we not asked the WHY questions?

WHY is this human disease still around today when it was first mentioned in 1552 BCE? (1)

WHY is diabetes and the rising rates not the hot topic on every dinner table today?
WHY are we not making this our business to know what is going on?

WHY are we not aware of what diabetes really is?
WHY is diabetes such a common disease?
WHY do we not know 100 years later, how insulin exactly works?

WHY do we not know the real facts about the dangers of diabetes?
WHY are we just thinking it is ok to live with diabetes?
WHY are we saying living with insulin every day is living a ‘healthy life’?

WHY are we not all aware of pre-diabetes?
WHY are we not well informed and educated about pre-diabetes?
Are most of us aware of what this actually is and how serious this is?

WHY are there long-term complications with Type 1 diabetes?

1996 (1)

75th anniversary of the discovery of insulin is celebrated worldwide.

WHY are we celebrating the 75th anniversary of the discovery of insulin?
What exactly are we celebrating?
Is this evolution for one of our oldest diseases?
Have we got the answers?
Are are we any closer to finding a cure?

WHY do we not have the answers for diabetes if the first insulin patient was in 1922? (1)

WHY did Insulin go into mass production 94 years ago? (1)

16th Century (1)

A Swiss physician, Phillipus Aureolus Paracelsus, considered the ‘Martin Luther of Medicine’ identified diabetes as a serious general disorder.

WHY is diabetes not seen as ‘a serious general disorder’ when we were told 500 years ago?

1776 (1)

When urine was evaporated from a patient with diabetes the residue was like granulated sugar and tasted like sugar.

Modern diabetes treatment has now abolished the idea of emaciation caused by the excessive loss of glucose into the urine. In its place, diabetes has transformed into a wholly different kind of killer. (9)

How many of us think of diabetes as a killer disease today?
WHY are we so complacent about this illness that so many now have?
WHY do we accept that diabetes is ok as we view it as not life threatening?

1916 (1)

Pathologist Elliott Joslin stated in his book ‘The Treatment of Diabetes Mellitus’ that the mortality of patients had reduced when fasting and regular exercise were introduced. For the next 50 years this man established a reputation as one of the world’s leading experts in diabetes.

WHY have we not taken on board that there maybe a possible clue to what was discovered exactly 100 years ago? 

Could it be possible that Joslin was telling us something simple and basic about diabetes?
Could it be possible that by addressing what the body needs this can make a difference?
Could it be possible that lifestyle changes are the simple answer?
Could it be possible what this man was telling us 100 years ago is relevant today?

So What Exactly is Diabetes?

Diabetes is a permanent change in our body’s internal chemistry. This results in too much glucose in the blood. The cause is due to a deficiency of the hormone insulin. (12)

What is Insulin?

Insulin is a hormone and is the main regulator of the sugar (glucose) levels in the blood.
Hormones regulate the cells of the body and are produced by glands.
Our glands are part of the Endocrine System which regulates metabolism, growth and development and tissue function. It is also responsible for sleep and mood and much more.
Diabetes is known as a common endocrine disease.

Insulin is produced in our pancreas by the beta cells within the cluster of cells called the Islets of Langerhans.

Insulin helps a cell to absorb glucose from the bloodstream.

When we eat our glucose levels rise and insulin is released into the bloodstream. The insulin opens up cells so they can take in the sugar and use it as an energy source.

Our body gets sugar in many forms and carbohydrates are the main ones.
In the digestive process carbs are broken down to glucose.
Carbohydrates include bread, pasta, rice, potatoes and all sweets.

Those who have diabetes either have a lack of insulin or a resistance to insulin, which means the sugar remains in the blood, which then results in blood glucose levels rising.

Type 1 diabetes requires an exact dose of insulin a few times a day.
Overdose of insulin lowers the blood sugar concentration and can result in a coma or even death.
A clear confirmation of the seriousness of this disease.

If blood glucose levels are low, the patient suffers from an overdose of insulin.
If blood glucose levels are high, the patient does not have enough insulin.

So if the blood sugar is too low, it needs to be treated with glucose, like orange juice, which is high in sugar.

Hypoglycaemia (12)

This is also known as ‘hypo’. When someone has low blood sugar, it deprives the brain of the energy it needs. With severe hypoglycaemia, people can become drowsy, unconscious or even have an epileptic fit.

Symptoms of Hypoglycaemia

Feeling sweaty or cold and clammy
Trembling and feeling weak
Feeling hungry
Blurred vision
Looking pale
Unable to concentrate
Feeling irritable
Feeling upset or angry
Behaving like person is drunk

Common Causes of Hypoglycaemia

Drinking too much alcohol
Eating later than expected
Burst of unexpected exercise

If the blood sugar is high, it is treated with insulin as this helps the cells to absorb glucose from the bloodstream. (13)

To date researchers do not know exactly how insulin works. (14)

Hello – can we stop and re-read this please

How come we don’t know?
WHY is this not a priority?
Are our researchers eating too much sugar so they are blind to the answer?

Our current intelligence marvels on all the advancements made like, life on other planets, building a city from desert land BUT we don’t know how insulin works?

Is this making any sense?

The Discovery of Insulin

We have known since the 19th century that patients who died of diabetes often showed that the pancreas was damaged.

1869 – Paul Langerhans, a medical student from Germany found that inside the pancreatic tissue which produces digestive juices, were clusters of cells and their function was unknown. These cell clusters which produced insulin were named the Islets of Langerhans.

1889 – Physiologist Oskar Minkowski discovered two main functions of the pancreas:
1. to produce digestive juices
2. to produce a substance that regulates the sugar glucose

1921 – Dr. Frederick Banting and Charles Best began experiments by removing the pancreas from a dog which resulted in the following:

Blood sugar rise
More thirsty
Need to drink more water
Urinating more often
Body became weaker and weaker

The dog had developed diabetes. (15)

Next experiment they surgically tied up the pancreas on another dog to stop the flow of nourishment so the pancreas degenerated. It was then removed, cut up and frozen in water and salts. This substance was ground up and filtered. The substance was called “isletin” and it was injected into the diabetic dog few times a day.

Blood Glucose levels dropped
More healthy
Stronger

To continue testing more, larger supplies of organs were needed so pancreases from cattle and pigs were used. The extract was called insulin.

Biochemist Bertram Collip joined the team with the task to purify the insulin so that it would be clean enough for human testing. Whole fresh pancreases from adult animals were being used.

1922 – Leonard Thompson aged 14 was near death. After the insulin shots he rapidly regained his appetite and strength. (15)

1923 – Medical firm Eli Lilly started mass production of Insulin. They were producing enough insulin to supply the entire North American continent. (15)

The discovery of insulin was awarded a Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine.
To date it is one of the biggest discoveries in medicine. (15)

1936 – Protamine, a protein found in fish sperm was added to make insulin release more slowly into the blood. The body was able to break this protein down slowly. (14)

Today genetically modified bacteria or yeast is produced to get a perfect copy of human insulin.

1982 – Mass production of Humulin which is the first biosynthetic and identical in chemical structure to human insulin. (1)

Human insulin is grown in the laboratory inside common bacteria.

The human protein that produces insulin is manufactured through an amino-acid sequencing machine that synthesises the DNA.

Synthesising human insulin is a multi-step biochemical process that depends on basic DNA techniques and understanding of the insulin gene.

Manufacturers manipulate the biological precursor to insulin so that it grows inside simple bacteria.

If you really want to know the ins and outs of the chemical structures and the full manufacturing process, check out this website on how human insulin is made.
http://www.madehow.com/Volume-7/Insulin.html

March 1999

Scientists conduct the first successful islet transplant at the University of Alberta Hospital. The surgical procedure becomes known as The Edmonton Protocol. (1)

Researchers are currently producing several new drug delivery devices. They are also exploring ingesting insulin through pills but need to look at covering them with plastic if they are to bypass the stomachs highly acidic environment.

There is also talk about inhaling insulin, using aerosols to administer insulin to the inner cheek and insulin patches. They are also talking about one day replacing the non-working pancreas cells with insulin-producing cells.

September 2016

Researchers at the University of Alabama, USA are looking at ways to wrap pig tissues with a protective coating. The ultimate goal is to transplant insulin-producing cell clusters from pigs into humans that have Type 1 diabetes. This would replace the need for daily injections. (16)

So how do we feel about having pig tissue inside us?
Are we now tampering with the laws of nature by taking from the animal kingdom?
Are we concerned where we get our insulin from?
Are we bothered about the animal welfare here?
Are we aware of the quality of the organ that we are receiving?
Are we just desperate to get ‘fixed’ so we can continue life as usual?
Are we any closer to finding out WHY we get diabetes?
Is this really the ‘ultimate goal’ or is there more?

Scientists are also working on correcting the insulin gene’s mutation so that diabetics would be able to produce insulin on their own.

WHY are we finding more ways to administer insulin?
WHY are we not focused on funding research to get to the root cause?
WHY on earth have we developed this disease in the first place?

According to the American Diabetes Association –

Rapid-acting insulin reaches the blood within 15 minutes and peaks at 30 to 90 minutes and may last 5 hours.

Short acting insulin reaches the blood within 30 minutes, peaks about 2 to 4 hours later and stays in the blood for 4 to 8 hours.

Intermediate-acting insulin reaches the blood 2 to 6 hours after injection, peaks 4 to 14 hours later and can last in the blood for 14 to 20 hours.

Long acting insulin takes 6 to 14 hours to start working, followed by a small peak soon after and stays in the blood for 20 to 24 hours. (14)

With due respect to modern science for all that it is doing to keep us alive and existing with new forms of medicines – is this the answer?
Is this the solution?
Is this the remedy to keep us going so we can function?
Is this the licence to continue existing but not look at how we are choosing to live?
Is this the passport to live like we used to before diabetes and not make any changes?
Is this dependent way of staying alive causing us other ailments or illnesses?
Is self-management the real way forward for this global epidemic?

England

2016

Information from the data analysis company, Exasol found that the prescribing of second line drugs, used when people with diabetes are getting sicker, has doubled in 5 years. (17)

Many people with diabetes also need to take medications to control their blood pressure and to control their cholesterol.

USA

High Blood Pressure (4)

71% of adults diagnosed with diabetes had high blood pressure or used prescribed medications to lower blood pressure. (2009 – 2012)

High Cholesterol (4)

65% of adults diagnosed with diabetes had high blood LDL cholesterol or used cholesterol lowering medications. (2009 – 2012)

WHY is there a direct correlation with diabetes and medication for high blood pressure and cholesterol?

Could it be possible the diabetes medication may have side effects that affect our blood pressure?

Could it be possible that our body is under pressure because of the way we are living?

Could it be possible that our breathing is altered with excess sugar and this gives rise to our blood pressure?

Could it be possible that our modern high fat diet is the main contributory factor to why we have high blood cholesterol?

Could it be possible that by reducing fat and sugar in our diet we would see a significant change in blood glucose levels?

Could it be possible our body is simply reacting as it does not want artificial foods to alter its natural state?

Can our lifestyle choices really make a difference?
Could it be possible that the way we are choosing to live plays a hand in this illness?

Could it be possible that we need more education about what diabetes is?

The prevalence of Diabetes is 3 times the number of all the cancers combined together.
Dr Srikanth Bellary, Clinical Director, Diabetes, Birmingham Heartlands Hospital (6)

The need to tackle this serious health condition has never been so stark or so urgent. Tragically, we are continuing to see too many people with diabetes suffering serious complications, and even dying before their time, and we know the key reasons for this are that they are being denied both the care and access to education that would help them to manage their condition well.
Diabetes education needs to be readily available everywhere and commissioned along with a proper local system that explains to people with diabetes the benefits they will gain from attending an education course and ensures that courses are well run.
Chris Askew, Chief Executive, Diabetes UK (7)

WHY are most of us not aware of the serious complications related to diabetes?
WHY is there little education in all our communities worldwide about diabetes?

Do we have a say who can run courses to educate us on diabetes?

Would it be wise to have those who have the condition to tell us more?

OR would it be more benefit to have presenters to educate us on diabetes who clearly are not in the pre-diabetes category?

In other words, they are choosing to live in a way that demonstrates they are taking RESPONSIBILITY for their own health and well-being.

Could it be possible that we need to get more real and honest about this epidemic that is threatening health systems around the world?

1959 – Two types of diabetes were identified.

Type 1 diabetes previously known as insulin-dependent or juvenile diabetes.

Type 2 diabetes is non-insulin dependent.

Type 1 Diabetes

Accounts for approx. 10% of cases. (13)

Did you know that Type 1 is an autoimmune disease in which the immune system attacks its own insulin-producing cells which destroys insulin production?
This means that the pancreas is no longer able to produce insulin.

Scientists do not know why this happens.

We all know our human body has an intelligence like no other.
Do we honestly think that our body is making a ‘mistake’ when it attacks itself in some way?

Can we simply just accept what we are being told by the experts that “by mistake it attacks its own insulin producing cells”? (13)

Could it be possible that the way we are choosing to live is why our body is attacking itself?

Are we complacent in thinking that there is going to be enough insulin to keep us going forever?
Are we aware that our fat cells are doing another job than what they naturally need to?
Do we realise that our body’s internal systems are not in harmony if we have diabetes?
In other words – inside the body our organs are having to work in an un-natural way.

Back to Type 1 – 

People with Type 1 diabetes usually inject insulin three to four times daily
Kidneys have to work harder to remove the excess glucose
More water being extracted leads to heavy urination
Feeling of insatiable thirst
Fat cells are broken down to counter sugar loss
Toxic levels of acids build up in the blood – Ketoacidosis

Without daily insulin treatment this type of diabetes can rapidly lead to a life-threatening situation.

Is it true to say that patients can ‘live a perfectly normal life’ with insulin treatment?
Who is defining what a ‘perfectly normal life’ actually is?
Has our ‘perfectly normal life’ deviated further away from our natural state?
Are we accepting the words ‘perfectly normal life’ because we can function?

Are we ok with the fact that our kidneys are overworking because of our diabetes?
Is a kidney condition a secondary condition because of diabetes?

Symptoms of Type 1 Diabetes (13)  

Excessive thirst and dehydration
Frequent urination
Hunger accompanied by weight loss
Blurred vision
Weakness, tiredness and sleepiness
Vomiting or nausea
Sudden irritability

Type 2 Diabetes

85-90% of diabetes cases are Type 2. (2)

The cells in the pancreas do not react to insulin in a natural way and this is called insulin resistance. Normally, insulin binds to receptors on the cell surface. This then activates the glucose transporter molecules in the cell membrane so glucose can enter the cell.

Insulin resistance occurs when some glucose is locked out of the cells.

Average of seven years from onset of the disease to diagnosis.
This means some already suffer damage to blood vessels, kidneys, eyes and nerves. (13)

Type 2 diabetes generally occurs in obese people and those middle aged and older.

Symptoms of Type 2 Diabetes (13)

Fatigue
Excessive thirst
Frequent urination
Blurred vision
Mood changes
High rate of infections
Slow healing process

Drugs are prescribed to manage Type 2 diabetes and patients are instructed to have a healthy diet and plenty of exercise.

 Can we stop for a moment and ask who is defining the words “healthy diet”?

 Are those writing diabetic diets equipped and educated in the facts about diabetes?

Type 2 diabetes can be delayed or prevented in 58% of cases. (11)

We all know that for most cases of Type 2 diabetes it is preventable through lifestyle choices.

So who knows what lifestyle choices are good medicine and who is advising us?

Does the person giving us the message Live in a True way that is not harming the body?

Is it just about diet, nutrition and getting more sleep?
Have we forgotten some of the vital ingredients like living a deeply self-connecting life?
That means our priority is staying connected with our body and listening to it.

Are those putting websites out to guide diabetics on what to eat really the masters of healthy living when they themselves are diabetics?

 WHY have we allowed the Internet to be a licence to post anything we want, which includes 3 tablespoons of sugar in a chocolate caffeine drink for diabetics?

If we stick our common sense hat on for one moment – is this making any sense?

Could it be possible that if an organisation posts a recipe for a diabetic beverage containing 3 tablespoons of sugar, we have a responsibility to question this with our common sense hat on?

Have we lost our moral compass?

Are we going to just read what’s out there and apply it as it suits us?

Could it be possible that we are going to find websites that don’t truly offer real change because that is what we are seeking?

Could it be possible that in our campaigns to defeat diabetes we may have a blind spot in us because we are pre-diabetes or already have the dis-ease in our body?

Possible?

WHY are our healthy eating advisors not getting long-term results?
WHY are there more and more new diets reducing sugar that are not really working?
WHY do we continue to eat copious amounts of sugar every day whenever we want?
WHY are we pretending that sugar free is not really sugar free in our body?
WHY do we consistently need this excess sugar to keep going?
WHY are our children craving more and more sugar every day?
WHY is our human body not valued and appreciated as a precious vehicle?
WHY do we need sugar taxes and regulations to try and stop us eating sugar?

WHY does the optician tell us that cutting out sugar will improve our eyesight?
Is there a direct correlation with eating sugar and the health of our eyes?

Do we just want a solution to keep on functioning but not ask the WHY questions?

Are we asking – WHY has our body arrived at diabetes?

What is going on in our life at the time when diabetes is triggered?

Was there something major that happened to us when we were diagnosed with diabetes?
Are we afraid to go there and look at the possible answers to these questions?
Do we truly want to take Responsibility?
Does our body really want exercise that is too aggressive for our overworked kidneys?

October 3rd 2016
BBC 1 ‘Diabetes: The Hidden Killer’ (Panorama) reported that approx. 40% of the patients at Birmingham Heartlands Hospital on kidney dialysis were Type 2 diabetic. (6)

If we have Type 2 diabetes we are over three times as likely to have kidney disease. (6)

UK

There are approx. 3.5 million adults with Type 2 diabetes. (17)

If current growth rates continue, numbers are expected to reach 5 million by 2020.
This is 5 years earlier than previously expected. (17)

Type 2 diabetes prescriptions in England have increased over the last 5 years from 26 million to 35 million. (17)

2nd October 2016 – The numbers of children developing Type 2 diabetes is increasing. 16 years ago there was not a single case of a child being diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes in the UK. (18)

Type 2 diabetes in children – 

I didn’t quite believe it. It wasn’t in any of our medical textbooks. We didn’t get taught it in medical school, so we didn’t expect to see it as an issue. We thought it was an American problem but in the year 2000 we saw the first cases in the UK, here in Birmingham.
Prof. Timothy Barrett, Birmingham Children’s Hospital (6)

So here we have a Professor of a Children’s Hospital saying diabetes was not in the medical textbooks so obviously the question is who was writing our textbooks?

We are seeing twice as many children developing Type 2 diabetes than we were seeing in 2004/5. A striking number of the children have evidence of fatty infiltration of their liver and abnormal liver function tests.
Prof. Julian Hamilton-Shield, Bristol Royal Hospital for Children (6)

Have we considered what the ‘striking number’ may possibly be today?
What is going on that our kids have abnormal liver function?

Children are developing Type 2 diabetes as young as ages 11 and 12.

One doctor says: “I saw a child last week who was developing cirrhosis of the liver.” (6)

Type 2 Diabetes in children may be a different disease to Type 2 diabetes in adults. Adults who get this at age 50 may not necessarily get these other types of complications, but the children we see with Type 2 seem to have got a more aggressive progress and they’re getting complications earlier than you would expect
Prof. Timothy Barrett, Birmingham Children’s Hospital (6)

Please re-read this as this is super serious stuff here.

Children are showing different complications to adults with the same disease and the process is more aggressive.

WHY?

Australia

The highest incidences of Type 1 diabetes are among children aged 10 to 14. (9)

WHY are our children amongst the highest in Australia?
What is going on for these children that triggers diabetes?

Diabetes risk doubles with more than 2 soft drinks daily. (19)

Researchers found that adults drinking two 200ml of soft drinks a day – whether it contained sugar or artificial sweetener were twice as likely to develop LADA and 2.4 times more likely to develop Type 2 diabetes.

Adults who consumed five 200ml servings of soft drinks daily were found to be at 3.5 times greater risk of LADA and 10.5 times at greater risk of Type 2 diabetes, regardless of whether the drinks were sugary or artificially sweetened.

Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults (LADA)

LADA is a subtype of Type 1 diabetes. It is sometimes referred to as “Type 1.5” diabetes as it shares some characteristics of Type 1 and Type 2. It is believed to be an autoimmune disease like Type 1 but it also incorporates insulin resistance like Type 2. (19)

So here we have it in black and white with no mincing of words.
There is no difference in the body if we have sugar or artificial sweeteners.

Hello again,

Have we been fooled by the name when it says sugar free or zero sugar?
Are we ever told that it makes no difference when we have these diet drinks?
Are the advertisers taking any responsibility selling us sugar free beverages?
Would we benefit if our social media alerted us with raw uncut facts about diabetes?

Do we realise that the harm to our body is going on and nothing has actually changed?

Are our sugar drinks’ manufacturers really interested in our health and well-being?
Are we accepting that profits before people is the norm these days?
WHY are we not asking questions about what goes into our food and drink?
WHY do we love the taste of sugar so much?
Could it be possible that we crave sugar because there is a lack somewhere?
Could it be possible that all the questions in this blog is spelling out another way?

Sleep Apnea (20)

Researchers found that people with severe obstructive sleep apnea were 70% more likely to have Type 2 diabetes compared to normal sleepers.

Obesity leads to a greater risk of Type 2 diabetes and sleep apnea.
Patients at particular risk for developing diabetes are overweight and physically inactive people.
Dr. Paul E. Peppard
University of Wisconsin School of Medicine & Public Health, Madison, USA (20)

Again we have it – another confirmation about being overweight and not physically active.

Do we actually need more evidence or proof that there is something in the way we are living that is directly contributing to our ill health?

The Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) have released trial findings involving a lower carbohydrate diet and exercise program for people living with Type 2 diabetes.

They are advocating for government funding to translate research findings into a lifestyle modification program that can be offered to the public. (21)

Would a common sense diet be enough to start with while we are waiting for a lifestyle modification program to tell us what to do?

Is this confirming that having less carbs in our diet means better glucose stability in our blood?

Is this study the proof we need, as the low carbohydrate diet showed greater reductions in diabetes medication requirements?

Any kind of weight loss will make a difference to diabetes control.
Professor Noakes, Research Director for Nutrition and Health, CSIRO (11)

9 out of 10 Type 2 diabetes patients are overweight or obese. (6)

Hold on – can we just stop and press the pause button here.

90% of our Type 2 Diabetes patients are overweight or obese.

So what is going on in life that makes a person overeat consistently?
WHY are we not concerned when our BMI is well over the average?
WHY do we ignore the excess fat we are carrying around every day?
WHY are we not educated about eating only what our body needs?
What is our emotional state, if we are being honest, when we have an obesity issue?

Pre-Diabetes (22)

Pre-diabetes, also commonly referred to as borderline diabetes is a metabolic condition and growing global problem that is closely tied to obesity.

If undiagnosed or untreated, pre-diabetes can develop into Type 2 diabetes.

Pre-diabetes is characterised by the presence of blood glucose levels that are higher than normal but not yet high enough to be classed as diabetes.

For this reason, pre-diabetes is often described as the “gray area” between normal blood sugar and diabetic levels.

UK

7 million people are estimated to have pre-diabetes and thus have a high risk for developing Type 2 diabetes.

Australia (9)

1 in 5 have pre-diabetes.
Over 60% of these people will ultimately develop diabetes without intervention.

So here we have even more to add to the statistics of diabetes. Thank God is what we should be saying as we now have enough technology to detect that we may get diabetes.

Is this enough for us while we chomp away at our chocolate or high sugar coffee shop drinks?

Is this the wake-up call we need to stop eating foods that are cooked with sugar and fats that our body simply does not need?

Is this shocking number going to get us away from our take-away full of hidden sugar?

Is this word ‘pre-diabetes’ stirring up anything inside us to make a change now?

It can be very frustrating walking down the high street and seeing all the high fat, high sugar, high calorie cheap food on offer. There does still seem to be a huge resistance to looking at changes.
Mr. Martin Claridge, Clinical Director, Vascular Surgery (6)

HbA1c (23)

HbA1c is a term commonly used in relation to diabetes. It develops when haemoglobin, a protein inside the red blood cells that carries oxygen throughout our body, joins with glucose in the blood becoming ‘glycated’.

By measuring HbA1c (glycated haemoglobin), clinicians are able to get an overall picture of what our average blood sugar levels have been over a period of weeks/months.

This is important for people with diabetes as the higher the HbA1c, the greater the risk of developing diabetes-related complications.

HbA1c is also referred to as haemoglobin A1c or simply A1c.

HbA1c provides a longer-term trend, similar to an average of how high your blood sugar levels have been over a period of time whereas blood glucose level is the concentration of glucose in the blood at a single point in time e.g. at the time of the test only. 

So here we have the know how – the tools to detect even more about our blood sugar levels.
What happens now?
What next?
How are we going to use this information?

What do our medical experts need to say for us to make changes?
WHY do we need a HbA1c to confirm our trend in lifestyle choices?
Do our daily choices have a hand in our blood sugar levels?
Is it the job of the hospital consultant to tell us to change our diet and start exercising?
Is it our responsibility to apply some common sense and just get on with it?
Is it our responsibility to take note of the medical staff and take action?
Is it ok to simply turn up and nod at the hospital staff but make no effort to change?
Is it acceptable to go back and take up another appointment without making any changes?

WHERE IS OUR RESPONSIBILITY?

Is HbA1c going on inside our body because we feel alone, isolated, dis-connected to who we truly are and no longer a part of the whole?
In other words, we cannot feel unity or inter-connectedness with others even if we live with them?

Have we in some sense lost the togetherness that we innately know we come from and move around like individuals who are divided away from others?

Research has shown that people with Type 2 diabetes who reduce their HbA1c level by 1% are:

19% less likely to suffer cataracts
16% less likely to suffer heart failure
43% less likely to suffer amputation
43% less likely to die from peripheral vascular disease (23)

Another Hello please stop and re-read moment.

Just 1% reduction in HbA1c level is speaking volumes to us.

If we just put our common sense hat on, we can feel that the sugar we consume directly or indirectly from food and drink is having a big effect on our blood sugar levels.

Even a slight reduction helps our heart and eyes.

Consider never having to worry about having a foot or leg amputated, just because we reduced our own blood sugar levels.

WHAT ABOUT DIABETES-RELATED AMPUTATIONS?

WHY do we not know more about this?
WHY does diabetes lead to PAD – Peripheral Artery Disease?
Why are toes, feet and lower legs being amputated for people with diabetes?

2015
WHY is the NHS saying diabetes-related amputations have reached an all-time record high of 135 per week? (24)

What is the actual real figure a year later – today?

The fact that the total number of amputations is continuing to rise is a huge concern because we know the devastating impact they have on people’s lives. As well as the psychological impact, they also cost lives as most people die within five years of having one.
Barbara Young, Chief Executive of Diabetes UK (24)

There is a stigma associated with diabetes, so now people don’t talk about it and are not seeking support … so we are seeing more and more of these complications.
Sturt Eastwood, Chief Executive of Diabetes NSW (11)

At the Royal Prince Alfred Foot Clinic, Sydney, Australia they have a ‘queue backed up for months.’ (11)

WHY are we waiting for someone to advise us about feet care?
WHY are those who know more and can do more not coming forward to help others?
WHY do we not have simple, easy to follow instructive educational websites, offering foot care for diabetes as a general well-being tip?

Healthy circulation to our feet can help to keep the tissues strong.
We can then encourage this healthy blood flow by eating the correct foods, keeping control of diabetes and not smoking. (12)

Could the ‘common sense medicine’ shared in one of our blogs have some answers for our foot care?http://simplelivingglobal.com/cold-hands-cold-feet

Australia

2016 (11)

Numbers of people needing amputations has grown by 25% in 2 years.

Patients are depressed and frightened of this disease that is eating away at them.
Gary Fettke, Orthopaedic Surgeon.

Australia (25)

$875,000,000 is spent every year on diabetes-related amputations and other costs related to diabetic foot disease.

Surveys show that the general public underestimates the seriousness of diabetes and many do not know the connection between diabetes and amputations.

85% of diabetes-amputations are preventable if problems are detected early and managed appropriately.
Professor Johnson

Almost all diabetes-related amputations are preceded by sores and ulcers on the foot.
Professor Zoungas

England (6)

The NHS spends nearly £1 billion (£1,000,000,000) a year on foot ulcers and amputations caused by Type 2 diabetes.

In England approx. £400 per night in hospital. After an amputation a stay in hospital could be as long as one month which is around £12,000.

An amputation can cost the NHS £18,000 with rehabilitation costing a further £20,000.

Global

In 2005 the theme for World Diabetes Day was Diabetes and Foot Care.

In a joint publication of The International Diabetes Federation and the International Working Group on the Diabetic Foot, the following is stated –

People with diabetes have a responsibility to themselves. They must play an active role in their own care and learn as much as they can about their condition in order to seek, recognise and act upon good advice.
Many complications of diabetes can lead to death or severe disability. (26)

Just in case you missed the date that was over 10 years ago.
WHY has a 200 page report with global contributions not made the figures go down?

What has really changed in the last decade?
Why do we celebrate this world awareness day?
What exactly are we celebrating?
WHY are the statistics on this blog confirming things have got much worse?

People with diabetes are encouraged to take a lot of responsibility for their own health, paying careful attention to their diet and carrying out regular tests on their blood and urine in order to monitor their progress. (12)
Professor Rudy Bilous – Understanding Diabetes, under Personal Responsibility, (p.1)

Is encouraging our patients enough for them to make the changes?
Is more needed?
Could it be possible that those encouraging also have a Responsibility?
In other words, those motivating, advising or encouraging diabetics need to ensure they are living a certain quality that is not pre-disposed to diabetes?

What is clear is that people are not aware of the dangers diabetes is having on their vascular system and how this relates to their feet. 

Diabetes leads to an increased risk of developing hardening and narrowing of the large blood vessels or arteries, which can lead to heart attacks and strokes and poor circulation in legs. (12)

Could it be possible that we are not correctly informing and educating people of the dangers, when they are diagnosed with diabetes?

Could it be possible that our lack of connection means the mind is not focused on the body and this leads to us not being aware when our feet have sores or ulcers?

Could it be possible that if we are not connecting to our inner-most self on a daily basis we are likely to ignore any minor foot pain or injury?

Could it be possible that if we are in ‘checked out’ mode, where our mind is not with our body, then chances are we will not acknowledge if our feet have some infection going on?

Could it be possible that if we are suffering with obesity, our priority is not to check our feet every day?

Could it be possible that most of us pay very little attention and have no regard for our feet?

Could it be possible that we do not take deep care of our body and this is what is missing?

When our body has high blood glucose this causes Atherosclerosis, which is the hardening of the arteries. That means we have poor circulation in our feet and it can also lead to a stroke or heart attack.

Australia

Heart disease and stroke account for about a third of deaths in people with diabetes. (9)

When we read figures and numbers do they really hit home to us about the real problem?
WHY do a third of diabetics die with a stroke or heart disease?
What is going on with our vascular system that it just shuts down?

In the past a large share of vascular problems were caused by smoking. (6)

All aspects of healthcare that are affected by Type 2 diabetes are straining at the seams, bursting at the seams, trying to manage this increasing number of patients with these complications. Each time one of these episodes occur, each time the patients come into hospital there is a huge price tag in terms of economic cost and mobilisation of staff and resources.

I am worried that the NHS will have to decide what conditions it does or does not treat.

We now probably need around double the number of beds in vascular surgery to help with this influx of the disease.

It used to be that perhaps it was unusual to find a patient with diabetes but now almost every patient that I come across on the vascular ward has diabetes.
Mr Martin Claridge, Clinical Director, Vascular Surgery (6)

WHY is it that we are not paying attention to what our health professionals are saying?

WHY are we comfortable taking insulin or medication for our diabetes but not really digging deeper to see if we can do more?

WHY are people smoking and overeating even after being diagnosed with diabetes?

WHY are we not taking action to exercise more and eat less?

WHY are we choosing to not take full RESPONSIBILITY for our lifestyle choices?

WHY are we looking to our health systems to correct our bad habits?

WHY are we seriously taking note after a foot or leg amputation?

WHY are some of us not asking questions about our lifestyle choices that may have led to diabetes?

Both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes cause damage to blood vessels and peripheral nerves that can result in problems in the feet and legs.

Peripheral artery disease and peripheral neuropathy are responsible for the increased risk of foot problems in people with diabetes.

Nerve damage can cause numbness in the feet and this can make people less aware of injuries and foot ulcers. If not treated this can lead to serious infections, which in turn can lead to amputation. (27)

“I was a young lout, enjoying my mates company with a bit of invincibility I suppose. I’d eat what I wanted to eat, and would skip insulin.
If I could take it all back, I’d be checking my sugars regularly, eating that healthy diet, taking my insulin — don’t take anything for granted.”

In his 20’s this man lost many of his toes and has since had a foot amputation, kidney transplant, dialysis and eye surgery. (28)

Can we look at the cost to the quality of human life here?

Can we also look at the cost to our health systems as this is not an isolated case? 

There are many many of us who neglect our body even though we know we have a disease and are prescribed medication.

To eat what we want and skip our insulin is dangerous not only to ourselves but to all those that are affected by our choices.

To drink alcohol which contains copious amounts of sugar is not good medicine for anyone let alone a diabetic?

Can we blame anyone?
Is it our responsibility to research, learn and educate ourselves if we have diabetes?
What about those who have no access to education – do they have a Responsibility?

Is it possible to change the systems and tell them they need to do more?
Is it the governments job to give us more funding because we like to live irresponsibly?
Do we ever stop and ask how our choices impact society in the long term?
Can we learn from those who are warning us to pay attention to our body?

Diabetes just ravages most of the systems. It has effects on the heart, it has effects on the blood vessels, it has effects on the kidneys and it’s just non remitting, unrelenting, you know it just carries on. At the back of your mind you always think that they have a limited lifespan because there’s only so much you’ll be able to do for them.

In a way you feel helpless. With the way things are going it’s probably going to get worse rather than better.
Dr Jyoti Baharani, Clinical Director, Renal Medicine (6)

Is tweeting our Secretary of State for Health making any difference if numbers are rising each week?

Are celebrity shoe donations to support a campaign enough or just another form of reducing this huge global problem that is not going away?

Could it be possible that defeating diabetes, campaigning and fighting for a cure are simply forms of reductionism?

In other words, we are reducing this massive global problem that has been around for a long time and we are no closer to the answer?

Is the reductionism coming from those who want a cure for themselves as they are suffering with diabetes?

Do the people who research, study and have websites about diabetes live free of this disease?

In other words, are they pre-diabetic or do they have a lifestyle that confirms they are not likely to get diabetes?

Is There Another Way?

WHY are Diabetes UK relying on charity donations to keep going?

Are donations the answer to this wake-up call that we all need right now or is there more?

Is the latest bariatric weight loss surgery the answer, the solution or the cure?

Bariatric surgery is seen as a life-saving operation.

England (6)

Bariatric surgery costs approx. £5,000.
It is viewed as a cure for diabetes.

One surgeon says: This is an investment that the NHS has to make, so the resources have to be moved from somewhere else towards bariatric surgery and it is not always easy. He says bariatric surgery is the only way to control the problem. (6)

There are 6,000 weight loss operations per year. The European average is 50,000 per year. It is suggested that if the UK met this and increased the number of weight loss operations, it would make a ‘small dent’ in the diabetes epidemic.

Is this telling us we are ok to go ahead and eat what we want, drink sugar beverages and continue on the ill health road because we have the cure at the end of the diabetes road.
In other words, there is a way now that will control our problem called diabetes.

Would it make any difference if we did not have the NHS paying for our surgery?
Would it make a big dent in the diabetes epidemic if we made sensible lifestyle choices?

Could it be possible that if we started to take responsibility, then the health systems could spend the resources on other types of diseases that urgently need funding?

Can we stop the blame game and do our bit?

How long will the flame of hope burn at the birthplace of Insulin in Ontario, (Canada) until a cure for diabetes is found?(1)

Is hope all we have when it comes to getting to the root cause of why we have diabetes?

Why do we have a time capsule locked away waiting for a cure for diabetes?
Will this evolve us in any way?
(1)

The million-dollar question is –
How are we LIVING that is causing diabetes?

Dear World

We don’t have the answers to WHY we have diabetes, so here are some simple questions to ponder deeply and consider –

Could it be possible that we are exhausted and this is why we crave foods to keep us going?
Could it be possible that we need the artificial sugar in foods just to stay awake and function?
Could it be possible that our natural body requires no bread, cake, candy or chocolate?

Could it be possible that our lifestyle choices have a big hand to play in why we get diabetes?
Could it be possible that our emotional state may be contributing to our food choices?
Could it be possible that when we give up on life, it maybe the start of pre-diabetes?
Could it be possible that some event or trauma triggers diabetes in our children?
Could it be possible that our lack of expression and holding back requires substances like sugar to push it down further?

Could it be possible that we love the comfort and relief that we get from eating foods that are high in sugar?

Could it be possible that we don’t bother to check the high sugar content in alcohol and soda?
Could it be possible we are too tired to check the ingredients at the supermarket?

On that note – has anyone checked the ingredients on most foods, including junk foods?

Whether it’s a healthy salad dressing or a packet of flavoured crisps, there seems to be some sugar. Do not be fooled as there are plenty of names for sugar.

If it says zero sugar then bet your bottom dollar there is some substitute made in the lab, which in effect does the same job as sugar inside our body.

Could it be possible that we choose to ignore the facts about the harmful effects of sugar?
Could it be possible that we think we have made changes when we use sugar substitutes?
Could it be possible that it suits us to not look at what goes into what we eat?
Could it be possible that we don’t have any real understanding about what diabetes is?

Could it be possible we have no real clue what the pancreas is and what job it has to do?
Could it be possible that we are not committed to life and so we don’t really value our body?

Could it be possible most of us don’t realise how serious and life threatening diabetes is? 

Could it be possible that we know in the back of our mind we can eat what we want and live how we want because our health systems will take care of us when things get bad?

Could it be possible we are exhausted, eat foods just to keep going and we have given up on our potential?

In other words, we lack the vitality to Live a True Life that has meaning and purpose because we feel that we have nothing of value to offer this world.

Could it be possible that in our inner most essence we are sweet and because we don’t connect to that sweetness, we look for the sweet stuff through sugary foods?

Is our connection to our essence, the core of our being, the very thing we are choosing to ignore every day?

Could it be possible that we are in some form of denial about the Truth of who we really are?

In other words, we are divine beings but we don’t want to know that as that would mean taking Responsibility.

Could it be possible, to keep that denial going we have to stay distracted with the outer entertainment, which includes driving ourselves to overwork, stimulating the body with our screen time on the computer and social media non-stop and eating what we want when we want?

Could it be possible that we have lost our inner-most connection and this is the root cause of all the disharmony and dis-ease in our bodies?

In other words, we are dis-connected from our natural state of being and so in that dis-connection we are seeking foods and making choices that are not aligned to who we truly are to fill the void.

Dear World

Enough has been said on this blog to confirm that we have a big fat problem in our world right now and we are not really taking it seriously.

We are eating what we want, living how we want, doing what we want, when we want and there is no RESPONSIBILITY for the consequences of our choices.

People need education, people need help, people need support, people need others to direct them, guide them, inspire them and show them that there is another way to live.

Is it time we took our health into our own hands and that means it is up to each and every one of us to recognise that diabetes is a major threat to our well-being and we need to take action. True actions speak louder than words and so we need to actively be responsible for all the choices we are making that is contributing to this lifestyle disease that is not going away.

It is clear diabetes is an overwhelming health crisis.

Hello

What are we waiting for?
Who are we waiting for?
WHY are we waiting around?

Is it time to get real, get honest, so that we can get to Truth and call out what we know is not working for us so that we can get on track and live a life of RESPONSIBILITY.

In other words, take an honest look at our lifestyle and knock out our bad choices that harm our body, drain our health systems and affect the whole world.

Could it be that simple?

On that note – client notes taken from a real life case study.

Michael D. Thompson
Computer Programmer
Age 41

September 2015

I applied only parts of the Simple Living Global Back to Basics Program.

If ALL of the program had been applied and lived there would be even more significant changes in my life today.

Note I only received support from Simple Living Global via skype and not in person.

Before Simple Living Global

Angry
Frustrated
Maximum 2 hours’ sleep
REM once a month

Dark circles under eyes
Empty vacant looking eyes
Very pale skin

Constant monitoring of blood sugar minimum 8 times a day
Constant battle of highs and lows
One day can be low as 35 and high as 450 in the same day

Long Range Insulin twice daily 50 units
Short Range 12 – 14 units after every meal 3 – 4 times daily
High Blood Pressure
Diet was lots of Ice Cream, Pizza and 2 litres of Soda per day

Would have sinus drainage and raw throat if did not take Zyrtec

Obese 250+ pounds

November 2016

I do not get angry.

I have a deeper understanding about what was going on for me when I was diagnosed with Diabetes aged 11.

I consistently call out all the things that frustrate me now and my mood has stabled.

I take full responsibility for the choices I make which are sensible and realistic.

I have received support from Simple Living Global to deal with my buried issues.

The Simple Living Global Back to Basics Program has given me practical simple ways to live everyday that actually work.

Sleep is now 8 to 10 hours per night.

REM sleep several times weekly.

No longer take Allergy medications that I have been taking for past 9 years.
Been off Zyrtec for 9 months now.

Long Range Insulin reduced to 37 units twice daily.

Short Range Insulin is zero to 7 units.

Only for safety do I need to check my blood now but could go days without checking it and it would still be in control.

Skin tone alive

NO dark circles
I no longer look like a member of the walking dead
My eyes are very alive and bright

Enjoy LIVING life for the first time

Blood Pressure Stable
However, Insurance Law in USA insist I take medication for high blood pressure because I am diabetic even if it is not needed.
I therefore choose to take the lowest dose because I have to or I cannot get medical care if I don’t take the medications the Doctor prescribes.

No junk food.

Diet is Gluten Free, Dairy Free.

Very careful when shopping for foods that have sugar content.

Weight – 215 pounds and still going down.

I authorise Simple Living Global to publish my name with these notes taken from my case study, which are accurate. M.D. Thompson.

The Simple Living Global Back to Basics Program is inspired by the work of Serge Benhayon and Universal Medicine.

References

(1) (2016). History of Diabetes. Canadian Diabetes Association.
http://www.diabetes.ca/about-diabetes/history-of-diabetes

(2) (2016, April 6). Cost of Diabetes Hits $825 Billion Dollars a Year. Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
http://bit.ly/2eM86rD

(3) (2015). Diabetes: Facts and Figures. International Diabetes Federation
http://www.idf.org/about-diabetes/facts-figures

(4) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Diabetes Statistics Report: Estimates of Diabetes and Its Burden in the United States, 2014. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; 2014
http://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/pubs/statsreport14/national-diabetes-report-web.pdf

(5) (2016). Types of Diabetes. Canadian Diabetes Association
http://www.diabetes.ca/about-diabetes/types-of-diabetes

(6) (2016, October 3). Diabetes: The Hidden Killer. Panorama. BBC One

(7) (2016, January 5). Number of People With Diabetes Reaches Over 4 Million. Diabetes UK
https://www.diabetes.org.uk/About_us/News/Number-of-people-with-diabetes-reaches-over-4-million

(8) State of the Nation 2016 Time to Take Control of Diabetes. England. Diabetes UK. (p.5)
https://www.diabetes.org.uk/Documents/Position%20statements/Diabetes%20UK%20State%20of%20the%20Nation%202016.pdf

(9) (2016, June 9). How Australians Die: Cause #5 – Diabetes. The Conversation
https://theconversation.com/how-australians-die-cause-5-diabetes-57874

(10) (2015). Diabetes in Australia. Diabetes Australia
https://www.diabetesaustralia.com.au/diabetes-in-australia

(11) Barlass, T. (2016, March 13). Amputations Due to Diabetes Up 25 Per Cent in Two Years. The Sydney Morning Herald
http://www.smh.com.au/nsw/amputations-due-to-diabetes-up-25-per-cent-in-two-years-20160310-gng434.html

(12) Bilous, R. (n.d). Understanding Diabetes. Family Doctor Publications Limited in association with the British Medical Association. (p.1, p.4, pp. 80 – 84, p.122, p.124)

(13) “Facts about Diabetes and Insulin”. Nobelprize.org. Nobel Media AB 2014. Web. 11 Nov. 2016
http://www.nobelprize.org/educational/medicine/insulin/diabetes-insulin.html

(14) (2016). Insulin. How Products Are Made
http://www.madehow.com/Volume-7/Insulin.html

(15) “The Discovery of Insulin”. Nobelprize.org. Nobel Media AB 2014. Web. 11 November 2016
http://www.nobelprize.org/educational/medicine/insulin/discovery-insulin.html

(16) (2016, September 8). Stealth Pig Cells May Hold the Key to Treating Diabetes in Humans. University of Alabama at Birmingham
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/09/160908084340.htm

(17) (2016, October 10). Type 2 Diabetes: Data Reveals Hotspots for Cases. BBC News
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-37584818

(18) (2016, October 2). Type 2 Diabetes in Children on the Rise. BBC News
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-37524488

(19) Whiteman, H. (2016, October 21). Diabetes Risk Doubles with More Than Two Soft Drinks Daily. Medical News Today
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/313612.php

(20) Woodfield, J. (2016, October 17). Obstructive Sleep Apnea Linked to Increased Type 2 Diabetes Risk. Diabetes.co.uk
http://www.diabetes.co.uk/news/2016/oct/Obstructive-sleep-apnea-linked-to-increased-type-2-diabetes-risk-92168325.html

(21) (2015). CSIRO Low Carb Diet Study – the Facts. Diabetes NSW & ACT
https://diabetesnsw.com.au/csiro-low-carb-study-the-facts

(22) (2016). Prediabetes (Borderline Diabetes). Diabetes.co.uk
http://www.diabetes.co.uk/pre-diabetes.html

(23) (2016). Guide to HbA1c. Diabetes.co.uk
http://www.diabetes.co.uk/what-is-hba1c.html

(24) (2015, July 15). More Than 135 Diabetes Amputations Every Week. Diabetes UK
https://www.diabetes.org.uk/About_us/News/More-than-135-diabetes-amputations-every-week

(25) (2016, July 10). Amputations – 4,400 Reasons to Take Diabetes Seriously. Diabetes Australia
https://www.diabetesaustralia.com.au/news/15266?type=articles

(26) (n.d). Diabetes and Foot Care Time to Act. International Diabetes Federation & the International Working Group on the Diabetic Foot. (p.8, p.9)
http://www.idf.org/webdata/docs/T2A_Introduction.pdf  

(27) (2016, February 5). Foot Complications. American Diabetes Association
http://www.diabetes.org/living-with-diabetes/complications/foot-complications

(28) Burin, M. (2016, July 10). Calls to Address ‘Staggering’ Number of Australians Losing Limbs to Diabetes. ABC News
http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-07-10/diabetes-australia-calls-on-urgent-action-to-reduce-amputations/7577688

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Comments 55

  1. This blog hits the spot and truly nails what is needed to get to the root of this tsunami that we called diabetes that has taken hold of the whole world. The statistics are shocking. I have friends and family that have diabetes. They go onto insulin /medication and they continue the life style of eating and drinking large amounts of sugar etc and then told by doctors to cut down and it stops there.
    Could it be our health workers are too exhausted to support others to get healthy and it is easy to give out medication without understanding why?
    This is by no means a judgement. I too had a serious condition and the author of this blog has supported me for a few years and my lifestyle choices have had a positive affect on my health. It is easy just to take medication (I know this) and not understand why our body has inherited a disease. Yes I take medication but I understand what is needed to support my body.
    I will certainly be sharing this blog with my friends and family.

    1. Yes indeed Priscilla – the statistics are shocking and if we think about it this is just one disease. I would say most of us know of someone who has diabetes as you mention here you have friends and family.
      Making no changes to our lifestyle after being diagnosed with diabetes simply confirms how irresponsible we are choosing to live. It does come down to choice.
      Our choices shape our life and it is our ill choices that give rise to the illness or dis-ease in our body.

  2. When something is not working, (no one understands why diabetes in the world is increasing so alarmingly), it is time to do to do something different. Simple Living Global has presented a way of living that is simple and makes sense. It has supported me to make many positive changes in my life, physically and mentally.

    10 years ago I was having issues with blood sugar levels and no one seemed to understand what was going on. By doing intensive self care and support from Simple Living Global, my body in its amazing wisdom basically healed itself. I have changed my relationship with my body and if I can truly listen to it, it knows exactly what to do in any situation.

    1. Great what you say here Ken – when something is not working then it is high time we done something different.
      Our very first blog on this website for humanity – Is there another way? presents a simple way of living that has been tried and tested and does work.
      It would be very true to say that I was pre-diabetes and my partner was morbidly obese.
      Thanks to the teachings of Serge Benhayon and Universal Medicine we have both completely turned our life around and in total we have lost over 16 stone in weight and that in itself speaks volumes. Diabetes coming from lifestyle choices is simply not on our radar now.
      This is why I have been able to support people like yourself living in another country. You are inspired by my living way which is taking RESPONSIBILITY for the choices I make every single day. No perfection needed.

  3. Smoke detectors are built to have an unbearably loud repetitive chirp when the batteries need changing. It is loud and this chirp hurts my ears and yet I personally know of more than one family to leave their smoke detectors chirping over the bed (every couple minutes!) for many weeks to months simply because they are so overwhelmed and exhausted…

    If we cant cope with changing batteries what kinds of choices are we making around food and other important things?

    Is this not evidence that people are not coping with daily life well at all?

    How can we ALL not be talking about this?
    How can we ignore these kinds of behaviours which are signs that what we are doing is getting us exhausted and leading to poor choices which might just shine some light on how we are making ourselves ill?

    Looking at our priorities is a good place to start and I recommend Simple Living Global blogs as priority.

    1. What you are saying here Jo Elmer is very serious. We are so exhausted and overwhelmed to even change a smoke alarm battery that is going off every few minutes.
      Have we become deaf or immune to the noise or have we just given up totally?
      It then leads onto your next question about food choices and other important things in life which need to be priority but are not.
      This website is saying a lot about our lifestyle choices and it is also presenting another way that has been lived.
      Science is up there with government agenda which is all about research but we cannot negate real life anecdotal evidence. If we are to be honest, we as human beings are a living science so what we say and feel does count and does matter.
      Therefore I am living proof that living in a way that does not make you pre diabetes is possible and it comes down to that word again RESPONSIBILITY. It is a key word in this whole website.

  4. Thank you so much for writing this blog, the statistics that you are sharing with us are shocking.

    How did we allow it to get this bad?

    At the rate that Diabetes is increasing it is like the plague.
    What will it take for us to truly stop and look at how we are living and make the link between this and illness and disease?

    Does it have to take an amputation for us to stop?

    Why do we allow things to get to extremes before we are honest enough to say that there is something wrong?

    There definitely needs to be many, many more awareness raising websites like this one, so that we can start looking at life and questioning it in a different light.

    1. Yes the statistics on this blog are shocking as you say Shevon. A wake up call for all of humanity as things are getting seriously worse.
      So what is it going to take for us to stop or will we ever stop?
      The programme mentioned in this blog had a woman about to have a second leg amputation above the knee as the foot was first amputated and now it needs more.
      Is this confirmation that not even an amputation changes anything because at no point is the patient asked to look at lifestyle or make changes. We live in this ‘do as you want free will society’ so thats exactly what we do.
      It would be great if we have more awareness raising websites like this one so that others are informed and not left in the dark about diseases like diabetes.

  5. A human being dying every 6 seconds from diabetes. A disease costing £24billion in just one country alone. 1 human diagnosed every 2 minutes. These statistics are off the scale. It is hard to understand how this is not front page news.

    The questions this blog raises on the subject go way beyond any normal research and perhaps that is why I feel I’ve been woken up to something huge and un-ignorable here. Why are we focused on cure not understanding? Why is this getting worse not better? Why haven’t we tried looking at this issue from another perspective, instead of focusing only on ways of administering insulin at scale? Where are we at as a race of people if this is going on all around us and we are not talking about it and taking an honest look at it? And if a big missing piece here could be ‘how much responsibility are we each taking for how well we live and take care of ourselves’, then where is my own responsibility in that, at after reading this blog?

    1. Correct Jenifer these statistics are ‘off the scale’ and confirming the seriousness of what we now have in our world. This is one disease and one country costing £24 billion pounds. Your questions need to be looked at as they make sense. Just talking in this way is opening up something for this topic to be discussed so more become aware of the real seriousness of Diabetes.

      This blog is ground breaking in the way it is asking us all to wake up and not ignore what is going on today. So why are we making it all about science and research for cure but not digging deeper to ask WHY on earth is this one of our oldest diseases and we have not yet found the real answer because things are getting worse.
      Is it time we started ‘looking at this issue from another perspective’ as you say.
      Is the missing piece that word RESPONSIBILITY which is a thread weaving through the blogs on this website?

  6. Thanks to this blog and its awareness raising I was discussing diabetes with someone this week. We both shared our experience of a low carbohydrate diet and its benefits. The person I was speaking with said that even when he eats bread, it puts him on a wheel of craving more and more sugar. We then came onto the subject of bariatric surgery and what he shared was very interesting. He spoke of someone that he knows that has lost a lot of weight through the surgery but in his view she has just replaced one addiction now for others as he has observed his friend go into using drugs and alcohol. This sharing was an eye opener and confirms that bariatric surgery is not the answer or the cure that it is heralded to be, as the root issue is still not being addressed through the use of this surgery.

    1. Thank you for your comment Shevon. This is interesting what you share about a real life case where the bariatric surgery to stop excess eating was simply replaced with drugs and alcohol. With due respect to the medics and those who are doing their best to offer solutions, could it be possible that there is more and science has not gone there yet?
      How many surgeries of this type can we continue?
      The list is endless as we see more and more obesity and less and less funding for our health systems to cope with.
      WHY are we not taking our life into our own hands and doing our bit with the word RESPONSIBILITY?
      Would it be wise if we started educating our youth about the effects of sugar, low carbohydrate diet and other useful information so that they can be better informed and then make choices?
      Would it be wise to bring in true health and well being presentations into Diabetes hospital waiting rooms and GP surgeries?
      Would it have a greater impact or effect if the presenter was not on the road to pre-diabetes because of the choices they were making to live RESPONSIBILITY in all areas of their life?
      Would that be a game changer?

  7. What an amazing blog, this need to be shared around the world. It is so detailed and informative. It gets down deep and dresses the true cause of why we make lifestyle choices that are detrimental to our own health.
    It all comes down to our connection with ourselves, our attitude to self. Do we act in a self-nurturing way, are we self-loving and respectful or do we gravitate towards the opposite end of the scale? Do we actually like ourselves, do we self-nurture at all, are we in disregard of who we are?
    Can we in fact change this attitude and what would a change in attitude bring? It may be that we would then take more loving lifestyle choices and in doing so vastly improve our health and wellbeing.

    1. Thank you for your comment Christopher Murphy. Yes this blog needs to be shared around the world and we plan to print this into a booklet format so more have access.

      Great point you make about our ‘attitude’ and’ what would a change in our attitude bring’? Well worth considering with our lifestyle choices as the topic.

  8. Truthful articles like this one and the True Support offered by the Simple Living Back to Basics Program are so needed.

    Without True Support we are lost.

    There are therapies out there claiming to be healing modalities that advocate that diabetics miss insulin injections. There have been deaths as a result.

    As this blog so clearly presents, diabetes is a very serious disease. Any true healing can only occur alongside conventional medicine and not in opposition to it, as the Simple Living Global Back to Basics program clearly demonstrates, hence the remarkable results of Michael Thompson’s case.

    1. Correct this article is very truthful Shevon and to the point. Not everyones cup of tea but well worth reading as it spells it out in a easy simple way so we ‘get it’.
      Once we read and feel something we cannot unread or unfeel it even if we tried.
      We then have a choice what we do with this new knowledge. Keep it as knowledge in our head and quote it or say its ‘interesting’ OR we live what is being presented and maybe things will change.
      Many critics would argue that the Thompson case study mentioned at the end is one and we need quantitive research double blind and triple blind tested in closed conditions.
      But what if Thompson is one of many real life anecdotal evidence which is qualitative. He is a living science, as we all are, so why negate the results and dismiss them because they are not what science wants right now.
      The Simple Living Global Back to Basics Program is not a modality saying stop taking insulin. It works with any medication and highly respects conventional medicine. What it is saying is that applying and living the Program brings results that are long lasting.
      What makes it different it that it is basic, simple, easy and practical. The person presenting lives this way and this is what brings the results. The bonus is it is a very cheap way of supporting our health systems.

  9. Dr Gary Fettke has been in the news this week, as it is stated that he has been silenced from speaking of the benefits of a low carbohydrate diet as he is not qualified to advise on nutrition.

    Do we have to be qualified to speak on nutrition?

    Reading this blog and research about low carbohydrate diets and Michael Thompson’s case study, I do wonder why someone would be silenced for speaking of the benefits rather than encouraged.

    I am not qualified in anyway, however I can speak about how I feel when I eat certain foods. Personally speaking I have seen weight loss and less health problems as a result of paying attention to the foods that I eat and their affects in my body and this includes both complex and non complex carbohydrates.

    1. This is a great point Shevon, what qualifies us to talk on nutrition.. for me someone who is speaking from a lived experience is definitely qualified, especially when it is about something that is affecting so many of us and has proven health improving for them, as you have shared about your experience with complex and non complex carbohydrates.

  10. Journalism like no other, I was not aware of half of these facts and reading it felt like there was a solid understanding of what is going on. A very stark contrast to a media that is constantly trying to make war and politics our main focus. Thank you for this all rounded – no stone left unturned education lesson on what is actually going on in the world today.

    1. Thank you Leigh for your comment confirming that this blog has given you a ‘solid understanding’ as you were not aware of all the facts mentioned about Diabetes.

      With due respect to everything else that is going on today in our world, it is surprising that we are not putting health on news headlines. This type of information needs to be more public so we can at least start talking and it is then that we can begin to have change. Not knowing, being ignorant or waiting for the media to tell us the ins and outs of Diabetes is not happening. Our health systems are facing bankruptcy and many are saying its about lifestyle choices. Is it time we each looked at the way we are living, the choices we are making every day and the word RESPONSIBILITY?

  11. Whilst weight loss surgery is seen as the current cure for diabetes, a recent study has found that the effects of weight loss surgery (laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery) are gastrointestinal problems. Two years after surgery many patients reported problems with indigestion and food intolerances including red meat. http://www.news-medical.net/news/20161219/Patients-who-undergo-weight-loss-surgery-complain-of-gastrointestinal-problems-study-finds.aspx

    I do question what the other effects of this type of surgery are and whether having this as a cure, means we swap one problem for another?

    Nothing really changes and the human being is not really healing when we focus on solutions rather than getting to the root cause of any issue.

    1. Thank you for sharing this link Shevon and what they are saying is making sense. We tend to focus on short term results but not look at the effects further down the road.
      Could it be possible that this is a form of Reductionism as we are not focussing on the whole and looking at the bigger picture?
      Consider this – if we know we are getting away with eating whatever we want in the KNOWING that weight loss surgery or our healthcare systems will take care of us one day, why on earth would we be motivated to make changes?
      Whilst we cannot change the mindset of people who refuse change of any kind, how about we bring in true health education to our young children and inform them of the facts about Diabetes and other diseases. This way they can make up their own minds if they want the sugar road or other ill behaviours that may lead to bad health.

  12. This is one of the best articles I have ever read about Diabetes – one that everyone would do well to read. So well researched, with many questions that start a much needed conversation about diabetes and many related aspects. That the “Cost of Diabetes Hits $825 Billion Dollars a Year” is incredible – and this is one single disease – so when you add the cost of cancer, obesity, heart conditions, to name a few others illness in our world today must be costing trillions of dollars. With that in mind, why are we not asking why all of these conditions are escalating? And, if everything continues to rise – how will our world be in years to come given our healthcare systems are already becoming bankrupt?

    1. I don’t think we realise how serious a problem this is and actually how simple it can be to not go down the road of pre-diabetes if we are prepared to make lifestyle changes and question life. I am deeply inspired by the case study of Michael Thompson. Being on such a cocktail of drugs he was clearly willing to see and explore another way which has changed his life around and has had remarkable results. I have no hesitation in recommending this article and this website to anyone who wants to know what True Health and Well-Being is.
      This website is a game changer for humanity and that means for us ALL.

      1. Correct Shevon – most of us do not realise how serious this problem is and it is not going away.
        Great what you say about how simple it is to not go down the pre-diabetes road by making lifestyle changes and to question life.
        In other words, start by being honest with everything you know that is not working in your life and then make choices to change that.
        True actions speak louder than words so we have to get on with it, not blame anything or anyone, not beat ourself up or judge but say oops and commit to life like never before. As the author of this blog, I can state that I was guaranteed to get diabetes with my poor diet filled with sugar, carbs and nothing else to speak of. This is no longer in my radar because of my commitment to life and the daily choices I make to not harm me, others or my environment to the best of my ability with no perfection.

    2. Thank You Jane Keep – Yes, this is a well researched article that deserves to be printed and distributed so more people can be aware of what this one disease is costing our world.
      What this is saying is so far nothing seems to be working that is making a U turn so we need to find another way and could it be as simple as bringing things BACK TO BASICS.
      Yes we know science is the latest thing which means everything has to be tested and tested but what if one true case study as mentioned here of Michael Thompson confirms it is possible and it requires Lifestyle changes.
      Is this a simple answer and we keep looking for complication and not really getting anywhere?

    3. The cost of this one single disease is scary and ADD to that other conditions like heart disease, cancer and obesity and there is a worry about our future health systems.
      What is our Responsibility here?
      We are bringing up our kids and this is what they hear on the news headlines?
      If we do not start educating our young children about taking care of themselves, from wrapping up warm daily and feeling what to eat and wear, which means learning how to truly connect to their body – what chance have we got?
      These kids are our future and ignoring these facts and hoping it won’t happen to us is not taking Responsibility.
      Even those with no children still have a Responsibility to do their bit as we can inspire others if we live what we want the world to be.

  13. Two papers have been published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology (5th January 2017), showing that even though gastric bypass dramatically reduced teenagers’ weight and helped them maintain weight loss over more than 5 years of follow-up, the surgery was also associated with the development of Vitamin D and B12 deficiencies and mild anaemia. Some of those who had the bypass surgery needed further surgery to deal with complications.

    While the surgery resulted in dramatic weight loss and Body Mass Index reductions, many of the teenagers remained obese. It is reported that earlier intervention may be needed with lifestyle changes such as diet and exercise.

    http://www.news-medical.net/news/20170106/Studies-reveal-long-term-effects-of-gastric-bypass-surgery-in-severely-obese-teenagers.aspx

    1. Thank you for sharing this article Shevon.

      What would be wise to look at is WHY on earth is nothing truly working in the long-term and WHY have we got such a global obesity crisis with your youth.
      The teenagers are our future adult population. There is now heaps of evidence that our health systems are not able to cope with the rise in all the illness and diseases which are becoming even more complicated. So where are we heading?
      Where are we going?
      How is this going to end up?
      How concerned are we as individuals about our future?
      Are our band aid solutions to function in life the real answer?
      Are we giving away our power to science and medicine so we do not have to take any personal responsibility?
      Are we ready to re-read the case study mentioned in this blog how Michael Thompson made only a few changes from the Simple Living Back to Basics Program and had lasting results?
      Are we as a world ready to get back to basics and be the change we want for our world?
      Note – if the answer is Yes then the word RESPONSIBILITY has to be the priority.

  14. Seriously? How dire must things be, to leave the alarm going off? It’s like ‘hello, there’s literally an alarm going off, are you listening?’.

    There’s that big R word that keeps coming up: RESPONSIBILITY. I was just reading about the ‘nootropics’ movement, where the next wave of innovation will be in the human body and what they are calling ‘biohacking’. So if you are tired you take a legit upper, with the amount and type depending on how long you need the up and the type of activity you’ll be doing (physical, mental, creative etc). If it’s bedtime you take a downer. There’s even a well funded Silicon Valley company focused on normalising this and they see it as a billion dollar opportunity.

    It’s tantalising to think you could just ‘pop a pill for that’, but does it feel true? Knowing there is more for humanity and our potential than the way we are living – yes. Knowing that our food choices have a big impact on energy levels – yes. Knowing that quality sleep is powerful – yes. Knowing that our everyday choices have a big impact on our vitality and output – yes. Giving away that responsibility and thinking we can just take a tablet – surely no?

    1. Wow, ‘biohacking’… marketing uppers and downers as a legitimate way to cope with life;
      to socially normalize the drugging of our bodies to force them to do want we want instead of learning to honor that the body knows and tells us what it needs is yet an even more extreme form of wayward behavior.

      How much deeper do we want to push ourselves into exhaustion and illness before we realize that there is no escaping the law of cause & effect?

  15. An update from Diabetes.co.uk on 13th January 2017, states that smart watches could predict the risk of Type 2 Diabetes developing as well as the common cold?

    http://www.diabetes.co.uk/news/2017/jan/smart-watches-could-help-predict-type-2-diabetes-risk-99768958.html

    It does raise the questions of –

    How much is being spent on this technology?

    and

    Is it really necessary given that if we address the way that we are living and commit to making changes to our lifestyle, change is actually inevitable?

    1. I find it very telling that we are willing to invest huge sums of money into technology, surgeries and medications as partial solutions to our symptoms of ill health but there is very little interest, talk or commitment to taking responsibility for our selves in how we live our lives and how this is effecting us.

      Simple Living Global and the many people who have applied, even in part, it’s principals of self care and responsibility presents clearly that we do hold the power to transform our ill health.

  16. This article is digging deeper in the questions being presented to the reader. It is not just about our daily food choices but a lot more.
    However, if we start to knock out the nonsense which is pure poison to our body, then that in itself can give rise to a clearer mind which may be ready for more questions and deepening a true relationship with the body.
    Speaking from lived experience, sugar was giving out crazy thoughts that would not stop. Removing that from the diet was not going on a sugar free diet or any diet. It was addressing my sleep and working on that and staying committed. Then I introduced walking everyday and this was easy.
    The rewards have come from living a life of consistency. Sounds boring but the deep joy it brings far outweighs these ‘momentary happy’ days that were really just better than a crap day.

  17. Incredible blog Simple Living Global, so informative about this disease that seems in an epidemic state.
    1 person dies every 6 seconds, this brought me to a stop moment .. every 6 seconds .. that’s massive.
    This sentence stood out to me – “We are eating what we want, living how we want, doing what we want, when we want and there is no RESPONSIBILITY for the consequences of our choices” and yet we want someone else to fix us, pick up the pieces of our broken body and make it work again without doing anything ourselves, I know I have done this.

    With all the focus and expense done on research and the refinement of treatments the numbers are still increasing, doesn’t this tell us something ?

    Michael D Thompson – thank you for sharing your turn around experience with your health from the Back To Basics programme and support from Simple Living Global … and this was in just over a year. This is lived proof that this health condition can be improved and prevented by life style changes.

    I was certainly a statistic for Diabetes with my vast intake of sugar and taste for alcohol and in my mid twenties I was diagnosed as Pre-Diabetic> Thankfully I listened to the warning and reduced my intake by a large amount, alcohol too, to completely stopping both of these. Also later on I made other changes to my lifestyle and daily living, taking more care of myself as Simple Living Global presents, no diabetes has developed for me, my blood sugar has been normal for years.

    Every time I read a blog on this site I learn so much more about the intricacies of the body, how it really is for humanity in the world today, and I am left so much more informed, with much to consider.

    This Website and blogs are monumental in what they are offering humanity, well researched factual information, a choice to make changes .. Simple Daily Living Choices that can turn around what can seem progressively worsening conditions for life, with lived examples of those changes here on this site .. surely it is worth trying.. really having a go.. consistently.

  18. http://wtop.com/health/2017/02/diabetes-death-toll-is-bigger-than-expected/

    Washington’s Top News report saying DIABETES DEATH TOLL IS BIGGER THAN EXPECTED.

    New research offers evidence that 12 percent of deaths in the U.S. are caused by diabetes or its complications, making it the third leading cause of death behind heart disease and cancer.

    The finding should be a “wake-up call” for people with the disease.
    People rarely die directly from the disease. They die from a condition that is caused by diabetes, such as heart disease, stroke, kidney disease or dementia.
    Samuel Preston, Sociology Professor at University of Pennsylvania.

    Preston has done research that shows most of the increase in Type 2 diabetes is attributable to the increase in obesity. “The two are very clearly linked.”

    Because so many people are developing Type 2 diabetes, it will continue to be a significant contributor to the mortality data in this country.
    Ann Albright – Director Diabetes Division, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    This report confirms that more that 29 million people have diabetes and 90 to 95% account for all diagnosed cases of Type 2 diabetes.

    We have a huge problem, it is not going away and there is a direct correlation with obesity.

    So is it time we started to look at WHY so many in our world have an obesity problem?
    Can we blame the food manufacturers and producers or do we blame those in government that allow us free will to trash our body?
    OR do we stop and say we have a hand in this because we made the choices?
    We are not forced to consume foods and beverages that harm us – it is always a choice even if we conveniently would like to think it is not.

    So is it time for that ‘wake up call’ that Professor Preston talks about and start making daily choices that have the word RESPONSIBILITY at the start?
    Is this what will one day be the game changer or shall we say life changer?

  19. I read in an article by Dr Mercola – http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2017/01/31/big-sugar-coke-conspiracy.aspx#

    “The rise of chronic metabolic disease in the U.S. follows the growth of the U.S. sugar industry and increases in per capita sugar consumption.
    Today, we consume about 20 times more sugar than our ancestors did, and we have very little control over the amount since what was once a condiment has now become a dietary staple added to countless processed and fast foods.
    Yet, if you were to visit with a conventional nutritionist, you’d likely still hear rhetoric that’s been parroted since the 1950s — incorrect and misleading rhetoric at that — that “a calorie is a calorie” and obesity is the result of consuming more calories than you expend.”

    Its quite remarkable given what this blog presents about diabetes, and given we know that obesity continues to be a problem in the world today that we have this rhetoric about calories being the issue – and that we are not being honest that we have a world wide addiction to sugar on our hands.

  20. I have improved my endocrine function simply by taking better care of my whole self.
    Diabetes is known as an endocrine disease so this is significant.

    For about 10 years I had increasingly darker and larger brown splotches on my skin.
    My doctors told me this was a sign of endocrine distress… but they had no recourse to recommend…

    This was a period in my life where I was pushing myself daily, over riding strong feelings that my relationship and my life needed to change and I began experiencing exhaustion.

    Over the past 6 years, with the support of Simple Living Global, I have been getting more honest, taking more responsibility and taking much better care of myself; Not juice fasting, special diets, workshops and appointments with all kinds of practitioners… but really, truly ME taking-care-of-my-self, consistently so…

    along with my life-long sugar cravings, the brown patches are now entirely gone.

    Also gone is my hypoglycaemia, excessive thirst and frequent urination, icy hands and feet, blurring vision, extreme dry mouth in the morning, feeling spun out, excess weight, caffeine intake, deep mood swings, lethargy, over sleeping and my concern about pre diabetes.

    I know I am not developing diabetes now.
    I know this because my body tells me in the same way it used to tell me I was hurting it

    My body is now letting me know, in its many voices, that what I am doing is supporting it.

    A huge thank you to Simple Living Global; I can only imagine the very different path I would be taking if I had not been inspired by Bina Pattel and asked for her support.

  21. Thank you for this well written and well researched blog Simple Living Global.

    The facts and figures you have highlighted are astonishing.

    Considering the possible outcomes of this illness, this blog should be sent to everyone diagnosed with diabetes because, with some people, it seems the attitude towards their diabetes is treated with nonchalance and disrespect.

    Recently I went to a restaurant with a group of work colleagues and two of them had Diabetes. They both ordered dessert with chocolate cake and ice cream.

    The statistics and consequences are very scary, considering that the medical experts are saying that 90% of Type 2 diabetes diagnoses are avoidable simply by lifestyle changes.

    Is it that, only an amputation or loss of sight will change this attitude in some towards this illness?

    It brings that old adage to mind – ‘you can lead a horse to water, but you can’t make it drink’.

  22. Being inactive is linked with a greater risk of developing pre-diabetes even for those of a healthy weight.

    Researchers from the University of Florida have said that these findings may explain why up to a 1/3 of slim Americans have pre-diabetes.

    People with inactive lifestyle were more likely to have blood sugar levels of 5.7 or above than those who are active.

    In the study 40% of inactive people aged 45 and older met the criteria for pre-diabetes or diabetes.
    https://consumer.healthday.com/vitamins-and-nutrition-information-27/misc-weight-news-704/slim-but-sedentary-risk-of-prediabetes-may-rise-718888.html

    So this research is letting us know that our overall lifestyle is the pre-cursor to diabetes and pre-diabetes and not just what we eat.

    Tim Bowyer is someone who’s lifestyle choices have enabled him to completely change his health, with both diet and exercise being key factors. Check this blog to find out more
    http://simplelivingglobal.com/do-diets-work/

  23. A US endocrinologist and childhood obesity expert, Professor Robert Lustig, is targeting Australia’s ‘burgeoning waistlines’ in arguing for a tax on sugar.

    http://www.9news.com.au/health/2017/04/22/12/13/us-expert-argues-case-for-aust-sugar-tax?app=applenews

    He says, ‘like alcohol and cocaine, sugar is toxic and addictive and is harming the future health of children.
    Fixing the obesity epidemic isn’t as simple as calories in, calories out. It depends on where those calories come from and how they are metabolized’.

    He makes a very interesting point when he says there is an improvement in all aspects of metabolic health when you take out added sugar from our diets.

    Two thirds of Australian adults and one in four children are classified overweight or obese.

    There are about 1.7 million Australians that have diabetes and an estimated 500,000 people are living with type 2 diabetes without knowing it.

    Professor Lustig says that personal and societal intervention with rehab and laws is what is required to tackle the issues of obesity and diabetes. “We have to have intervention of some form, and taxation is one way of doing it”.

    Having a sugar tax may be one way to help to solve the problem of having too much sugar in our diets but how high will this tax have to be to make any difference?

    If it’s just a few pennies, people may well moan about it, but we will always find a way to have our sugary treats.

    If it’s a large increase in tax, people may be up in arms about it and governments may well be fearful of the backlash.

    Even if it is a large tax increase there will always be those who can afford to buy there products and it could have the potential to create a black market in cheaper, unhealthier products for the poorer people.

    Having a sugar tax to tackle obesity and diabetes may well be ‘one way of doing it’, but will it be the most effective way?

    Is it possible that more education is needed about the harmful effects of sugar?

    It could be said that the food industry is culpable here because they have added fructose to many foods for decades which has created an addiction for sweet foods.

    Could it be that the governments need to do more to bring awareness about the dangers of these hidden sugars?

    Could it be that we need to look at targeting the manufacturers of these foods that have added sugar to their products?

    It is quite easy to blame the manufacturers, the government or the stores for stocking the products but the reality is, no-one is forcing us to eat these foods.

    Could it simply be, that we as individuals, need to take more responsibility for what we eat?

    1. A golden question you ask here Tim:
      ‘do we simply need to take more personal responsibility for what we eat?’

      Could the answer be this simple but we don’t see it because… we don’t ‘want’ to.

      With our world wide over weight issue we have a supply and demand for sugar so we cant just blame the suppliers; we need to face the fact that the demand is ours and we need to look at why we “need” sugar?

      Taking personal responsibility for our health is confronting but gets to the root of the issue, as Simple Living Global has shown in hundreds of case studies (mine included) where a sugar tax does not get to the actual ’cause’ of the problem and is only a partial solution and one with it’s own societal complications.

  24. This article states that in an estimated 45% of cases people with mental illness and diabetes go undetected. (Indian Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism).

    http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/317458.php

    The article also states that 30 – 50% of people with diabetes experience diabetes distress. The responsibilities of managing the condition is one reason given as to why.

    Making adjustments to one’s diet and constantly checking blood sugar can also lead to feelings of anxiety and depression.

    When we are faced with changes that seem beyond our control and life is not what we would like it to be, we can easily slip into feelings of depression and completely give up on life. Diabetes is a very serious condition that is life threatening and I can understand that a person’s whole life has to change as a result.

    The fact that we are repeatedly told that Diabetes is preventable through lifestyle choices tells us that it is not a given that we should have this disease and that something is seriously wrong in the way that we are living that is causing the numbers to rise and rise and rise.

    How can our health systems almost be bankrupted by a disease that is preventable through lifestyle choices? It doesn’t make sense.

  25. The massive dose of common sense around statistics on obesity and diabetes in this blog beckon the next question(s) which goes like this:

    “…OK, if self accountability is needed to reverse world wide health issues then what is the key to unlock our sense of self preservation and the ability to choose what supports, heals and brings harmony instead of the many things we have been choosing which harm us? How do I find the key to unlock true responsibility?”

    If we simply need to change what we eat and perhaps how and why we eat than how do we actually do this when…

    …a most common phenomenon is that, when it comes to health and well being, we so often end up doing things we say and think we don’t want to do and we don’t do the things we decided to do…

    …and so diets and discipline do not work as they do not address the reason we are behaving disharmoniously in the first place.

    We can wait until the pain forces us to try something different… OR we can ask for more awareness now.

    For me true change, healing and learning to take responsibility started like this:

    1. I reached a point of saying “There has to be more I am not wanting to see”.
    2. This opened me to accept a deeper level of commitment to get to the truth of my choices.
    3. This led me to Simple Living Global, since I was willing to work on my self-accountability.
    4. Simple Living Global supported me to get to the root of what I was holding onto that was in the way of me being loving to myself and living my life as I feel I am to live it.
    5. As I did the work of Getting Back to Basics and developing a foundation of being self honoring (consistently and without perfection) my need for things that hurt my body or took me away from my essence dwindled away; even things I could not imagine living without (*like ice cream*) have no hold over me anymore.

    The key is inside each one of us.
    Simple, true, miraculous. You have to use it to believe it.

  26. http://www.business-standard.com/article/current-affairs/alzheimer-s-risk-for-those-with-high-blood-sugar-finds-study-117022400506_1.html

    Scientists are saying that high blood sugar levels may not only cause Diabetes, but also lead to Alzheimer’s disease.

    Our current world subscribes to science and we want research and evidence about anything and everything. Would it be true to say that man has become multi-symptomatic?
    In other words, we have more than one thing going on that the medics are struggling to keep up with in terms of solutions and managing our symptoms.

    Is there another way and are we ready to at least consider this as nothing is stopping the rise in Diabetes and now with Alzheimer’s on the radar, our future does not look good in any way.

    If we simply read this in-depth blog that gives us plenty of information in simple language, so we can understand what Diabetes is about we are left in no doubt that it is a killer to our body and common sense would tell us that sugar is not what our natural body wants.

    We all know our lifestyle choices affect our body and Diabetes is now predicted to bankrupt our health systems.

    Are we bothered? Are we concerned? Are we worried?

    Or do we just keep doing what we do without giving it much thought until things go wrong?

    We maybe the lucky ones but is that enough?

    Is there more we could do or are we going to just continue as we are now living, in the hope that the world will come up with another solution and if it doesn’t, then the medical world will help us even if it is a poor quality of life.

  27. On August 30th 2016 Diabetes UK reports that the weekly figure for amputations had risen to 20 a day, totalling 7,370 a year.
    https://www.diabetes.org.uk/About_us/News/Twenty-devastating-amputations-every-day/

    This is a significant increase in just one year and we are a year on from this report, so will the statistics of what is for most preventable going to be increased again a year later?

    Chris Askew, Chief Executive of Diabetes UK, said: “The fact that the total number of amputations is continuing to rise is a huge concern. We know the devastating impact they have on people’s lives as well as the huge cost to the NHS, yet we are not seeing action happening quickly enough across all areas of the country to address this.”

    Are WE part of the action needed in how we are taking care of ourselves to reduce what is largely a preventable procedure for most? to take care of our precious body and keep our limbs, feet and toes?

  28. ‘1 in 3 people will be obese and 1 in 10 will develop type 2 diabetes by 2034, in the UK, plus the current estimated budget is 10 million pounds on diabetes every year’ these are serious statistics you share and a huge cost to the NHS.
    This is just one health condition causing such a strain on our medical system.

    If this condition can be improved greatly or prevented through our lifestyle choices.. why are we not doing this for ourselves? allowing these statistics to grow and our health to decrease?

  29. BBC Radio 2 today on the afternoon talk show with Jeremy Vine was about Type 2 Diabetes. The GP who was speaking said in his surgery almost every Type 2 he has treated or diagnosed was obese.

    Of course there were some who disputed this as their case was different but if we just stop and pause for a moment…Is there a direct correlation between Diabetes and Obesity?

    If we simply read this blog and join the dots, would we be able to say that Obesity is linked to the chances of getting Type 2 Diabetes?

    We have heard it over and over again that lifestyle choices are playing a big part in WHY anyone gets Type 2 Diabetes in the first place.

    The radio program talked to people who had cut out carbohydrates and sugar and this immediately had a positive effect.

    With simple common sense we all know that sugar is not needed if we lived in our natural state and had adequate quality sleep and walked every day.

    We forget easily because it suits us that most foods contain sugar and this is a killer.

    Sugar is linked to Obesity and this blog is spelling out the ins and outs of insulin, the pancreas and the job it has in maintaining our blood sugar.

    What if we are exhausted because of our ill lifestyle choices and this leads to us eating and craving foods to give us energy to keep going but it is a false energy?

    What if our body converts ANYTHING we consume to sugar inside us, just to keep going and eventually this false way of living affects our organs and in particular the pancreas as it picks up the slack?

    Is this making any sense?

  30. http://www.uni-goettingen.de/en/562390.html

    International team of scientists calculate costs of $1.3 trillion as the new global cost of Diabetes.

    The results of the study are published in the Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology.

    $1,300,000,000,000

    Does this number bother us or scare us in anyway?
    Where are we going to come up with this kind of money?
    Do we need to get our researchers not looking for solutions, but digging deep to find out WHY on earth Diabetes has got so bad?

    With all the modern technology and all the so called Intelligence we have in this world, how have we let this dis-ease get so out of control?

    This journal is saying that the growing prevalence of Diabetes, specifically in low and middle income countries, reveals the massive shifts in health trends since the 1990’s.

    WHY are we not taking this seriously and what is missing here for the general public who seem to be unaware of the real dangers of what Diabetes is doing to the human body?

    When are we going to join the dots and keep it simple?

    Diabetes is on the rise and it will bankrupt our health systems worldwide if we do not get to the root cause.

  31. Public Health England have just produced a report entitled: ‘Health Profile for England’ which states that

    Diabetes has just made the top ten causes of ill health and disability (morbidity) for the first time.

    The two biggest risk factors behind levels of ill health are excess weight and high blood sugar.

    The findings published in the report state that there are health inequalities between the rich and the poor, with people living in richer areas experiencing 20 more years in good health than people in the poorest areas.

    Whilst this news report focuses on the health inequalities, the first 2 points above regarding Diabetes and the risk factors behind ill health are equally worth taking notice of and discussing.
    https://www.bjfm.co.uk/people-living-longer-but-spending-more-time-in-poor-health

    We know that ‘excess weight and high blood sugar’ are risk factors behind Diabetes as detailed in this article by Simple Living Global, but Public Health England have found that these two are the biggest factors behind ill health and hence not just Diabetes.

    We know that lifestyle choices like poor diet and a lack of exercise lead to excess weight and high blood sugar but would we benefit from a deeper understanding about what leads to these lifestyle choices?

    What is actually behind this and why would any of us make choices that guarantees ill health?

  32. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-40900269#
    BBC News – 12 August 2017
    Type 2 Diabetes rise in children ‘disturbing’.

    Local councils are warning that the rise in cases of Type 2 Diabetes in children is a “hugely disturbing trend”.

    The youngest children affected are aged between 5 and 9.
    Being overweight is the biggest risk factor.
    75% of these children were obese.

    Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health doctors are saying Type 2 Diabetes is preventable in most cases and more action is needed to reverse the trend.
    Diabetes UK said there should be moves to reduce the sugar and saturated fat content in food.

    WHY are we not ready to listen to the experts?
    WHY are our children not educated with information from blogs like this, from Simple Living Global?
    WHY are our children as young as 5 getting Type 2 Diabetes?
    WHY are we all not asking more questions and finding out WHY?
    WHY are certain children from Asian and black and ethnic backgrounds more affected?
    WHY are kids in deprived areas more likely to have Type 2 Diabetes?
    WHY are we not considering blogs like this one that give us some insight into Diabetes?
    WHY are we not looking at our lifestyle choices that may be affecting our children?
    WHY are we as adults allowing this to continue on our watch?

    How are we choosing to live that gives rise to childhood obesity?
    What is our part here for those who are not parents, as true citizens of this world?
    What can each of us do as individuals to address this killer disease called Diabetes?

    Is cutting out 5% sugar in products going to stop our kids from eating sugar or over eating?
    Are daytime TV adverts on sugar going to stop overnight, whilst this disturbing trend is on the rise?
    Can we be doing more – in other words taking true action on the street and in our homes?
    Are we as individuals all responsible here and not just the parents of these children?

    Are we willing to at least be honest and put our common sense hat on?
    What if we re-read the case study at the end of this blog, which confirms there is another way?
    WHY have we allowed this to happen to our children, who are the future teenagers?
    Are we aware that these teenagers are not going to have a true quality of life?
    Have we realised they are going to be our future generations on earth?

    We are continuously being told now that Diabetes has got worse and the age of onset is getting younger and younger.

    Is this of concern to us and do we care enough to at least start talking about this at every dinner table and every conversation with anyone and everyone?

  33. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/blogs-trending-39232620
    BBC news story – 11 March 2017

    Here we have a real life story about a guy called Marino who is saying he developed Type 2 Diabetes after spending a year live streaming on video gaming. He calls himself a professional user of an online platform that has a huge community of gamers and game watchers.

    He quotes “viewers equal money”.

    Warning others about his health risks of his streaming career received comments from other gamers who said they too experienced health issues following marathon gaming sessions.

    For those of us who don’t know what that is – basically you don’t move from your seat and this is covered in detail in our Video Game blog – see link
    http://simplelivingglobal.com/video-games-day-12-september/

    Could we ask a sensible question once we see the picture of this man in front of his gaming setup. Is this really a career and if it is WHY would he get Type 2 Diabetes?

  34. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/10/19/one-five-children-obese-time-leave-primary-school/

    Figures are now suggesting that 1 in 5 children leaving primary school are obese.

    NHS data showing that 9.6 percent of children are dangerously over weight by the time they start school.

    “Each year, the childhood obesity statistics tell the same devastating story.’ says Caroline Cerny leader of the Obesity Health Alliance, a coalition of more than 40 organisations.

    With obesity levels rising 2 years consecutively in children starting school is it time we all looked at how this is happening?

    What is our role in it? I don’t have children but can see that every choice I make around food contributes to whether I am being a role model for children to eat to nourish themselves or not. Whether I exercise to keep my body healthy in day to day life, whether I care for myself to make these changes.

    Do we have a responsibility not just to ourselves for our health but to our children, our next generation?

    What level of illness and disease do we need for us to stop and realise something has to change.. and is it possible that that change that is so needed starts with each one of us?

  35. Metro – 3 November 2017

    A study has shown that drinking 2 cans a week of sugar-sweetened fizzy drinks puts an increased risk of getting Type 2 Diabetes.

    Drinking one can of pop raises the chances of high blood pressure.

    The findings demonstrate there is a clear need for public education about the harmful effects of excess consumption of sugar sweetened beverages.

    74% of 85,471 food and drink products in US have added sugar.

    If we just stopped, read this blog, put our common sense hat on and added some real honesty – we would be on our way to asking questions and wanting to learn more…

    Something is seriously wrong if we need any stimulation to our natural state. Babies are not born requesting a spoon of sugar as their first meal. Somewhere along the line we introduce this false man made substance, which has a drug like affect on us and leaves us wanting more.

    Who has not got a fix that they go to for different feelings that come up during the day?

    Is it time to ask more questions and get to the root cause of WHY we need any sugar drink or food with added sugar?

    Is it because our lifestyle choices are not giving us the vitality levels that are possible?

    Is it because we do not want to take Responsibility for the exhaustion that we feel on a daily basis?

    Is it because we have no idea where to start with the tension we have everyday in our body?

    Is it because we have this constant jittering that we think, goes away when we eat or drink sugary stuff?

    Is it because we prefer to numb what we feel, by simply reaching for the can as it is what we always do and it’s our preferred choice?

    Is it time to get real, get honest so we can get to the Truth of WHY we need any sugar to keep us going?

  36. An article in ‘The Week’ magazine, 1st April 2017, talks about “How to reverse diabetes.”

    Type 2 Diabetes is generally considered to be a lifelong condition that can only be managed rather than cured. But a small trial has suggested that it can be for significant periods – if patients follow an intense treatment regime.

    Researchers at McMasters University in Canada recruited 85 patients with diabetes.

    Of these patients, 55 were put on a diet plan that cut their energy intake by 500-750 calories a day and were given dietary advice, a personalized exercise program and medicines and insulin to control their blood sugar levels.

    They than maintained this program for either 8 or 16 weeks.

    The other 28 patients were given the standard lifestyle advice and blood sugar management.

    Three months after completing their program, 11 of 27 people in the 16 week group were in remission, as were 6 of those in the 8 week group.

    In the control group, by contrast, only 4 out of the 28 people were.

    After a year, however, the difference was negligible – perhaps the patients had not committed to the lifestyle changes.

    This last sentence says it all really – whilst we are in this controlled environment, in this bubble, it is so much easier to stay on the program, but once we get back to the real world of everyday life, it sinks in that we have to maintain this way of life forever – we have to change our way of life, our lifestyle, for the rest of our lives.

    For many of us, we find this level of commitment and responsibility too much.

    Is it possible that we like the idea of change, but deep down we don’t really want to permanently change because we like our comfortable lives?

    What this study has shown in those people that went into remission, is that if we start to make those choices to take care of ourselves, if we make lifestyle changes that truly support our bodies, we have the potential to change illness and disease.

    Is it possible then, that actually, we are the creators of all of our own illnesses and diseases?

    Is it possible then, that all of our illnesses and diseases come FROM us rather than coming TO us?

    Although this article says –

    “Type 2 Diabetes is generally considered to be a lifelong condition that can only be managed rather than cured. But a small trial has suggested that it can be for significant periods – if patients follow an intense treatment regime.” –

    we can change things if we truly commit to taking responsibility for ourselves. It can be healed rather than cured, it can be for the rest of our lives rather than for a significant period and it certainly doesn’t have to be intense.

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