World Hypertension Day

17 May

WHY on earth do we need a World Hypertension Day?

WHY are the world and its mothers and brothers popping pills for Hypertension?

Do we even know what Hypertension means?
Are we interested or bothered about Hypertension?

For the purposes of this article, Hypertension and High Blood Pressure are the same.

Has anyone heard of WHD – World Hypertension Day?
Have we heard of WHL – World Hypertension League?

Are we aware this Hypertension Day started in 2005?
Are we interested if our blood pressure is high?

Do we know of ISH – International Society of Hypertension?
Do we know that ISH was established in 1966?
Do we know there is an official Journal of Hypertension?

Do we all know what all this means?
Do we understand what Hypertension is?
Do we know the facts about Hypertension?

WHY are they calling it a ‘silent killer’?
WHY is this a modern day epidemic?
WHY is it classed as a ‘Global Public Health Issue’?
(1)

WHY has this become such a big issue worldwide?
WHY does high blood pressure lead to complications?
WHY has all the advancement of scientific research and knowledge not been able to stop this deadly killer?

WHY has all the commitment, promoting and funding for prevention and management seen a rise in hypertension?

WHY has all the Intelligence in our world not nailed this yet?

What is this telling us about the blood pressure of our nations?

Should we be concerned knowing that there has been an organisation established since 1966, dedicated to finding ways to manage and prevent heart disease and strokes in hypertension and related cardiovascular diseases around the world?

Is this telling us that after 50 years, we are really not any closer to finding the root cause of WHY someone develops hypertension?

Is this spelling out to us that hypertension is a global problem?

Hypertension is sometimes called the ‘silent killer’ because it produces no symptoms and could go unnoticed and untreated for years.

Is the following list confirming WHY we have not yet got any closer to the root cause of this ‘silent killer’?

Application
Best Practice
Best Treatment
Clinical Science Research
Dynamic Forum of Leaders
Education Program
Global Networks
Initiatives
International Forum
Knowledge
Management
Mentoring Opportunities
Mentorship Students
New Awards
New and Young Investigators
Platform to Exchange Ideas
Prevention
Research Fellows
Scientific Council
Scientific Meetings
Scientific Research
Sharing Expertise
Showcasing
Solutions
Special Focus
Strategic Alliances
Strategic Relationships
Successful Committee Members
Teaching Activities
(2, 3, 4)

After all this do we actually know what Hypertension is?
What does it mean to us the general public on the street?

The Concise Oxford English Dictionary says –Abnormally high blood pressure. (5)

Google the word and you get –Abnormally high blood pressure and a state of great psychological stress.

Now we all know HYPERTENSION is
Abnormal
The pressure is high
Our blood is not able to do its natural job
We are in a state of stress
Google tells us it is psychological

Hyper means over, above and beyond.
Excessively above normal. Unusually energetic. Abnormally active.
(5)

Tension means strained state or condition resulting from forces acting in opposition to each other.
Mental or Emotional strain.
(5)

Let’s join the dots.

Hypertension means something is going on inside us that is causing our blood pressure to rise over and above what is normal for our natural state of being.
The strain on the body is abnormally active and coming from conflict – mental and emotional.

What exactly is blood pressure?
WHY is it so important for our human body?

When our heart beats, it pumps blood around our body to give our cells the oxygen it needs to make vital energy that cells need to survive.
As the blood moves, it pushes against the sides of the blood vessels. The actual strength of this pushing is our blood pressure.
The higher the pressure in blood vessels the harder the heart has to work in order to pump blood.
(1)

Blood pressure normally rises and falls throughout the day, but it can cause health problems if it stays high for a long time. (6)

The pressure produced by the heart is highest when it contracts or beats and this is known as the systolic (higher value) pressure.
When the heart muscle relaxes in between heartbeats and the pressure is at its lowest in the blood vessels, this is known as diastolic (lower value) pressure.
(7)
Both systolic and diastolic pressures are measured when we have our blood pressure checked. (8)

If our blood pressure is too high, it puts extra strain on our arteries and our heart and this may lead to heart attacks and strokes. (7)

Next –

Blood pressure is measured in millimetres of mercury (mm Hg) and is recorded as two numbers, usually written one above the other. (1)

Normal Blood Pressure

Normal blood pressure for adults is defined as a systolic pressure below 120mmHg and a diastolic pressure below 80 mmHg.
It is normal for our blood pressure to change during sleep, when we wake up, are nervous or excited. When we are active, our blood pressure increases and once the activity stops, blood pressure returns to our normal baseline range.

New born babies often have very low blood pressure numbers that are considered normal for babies while older teens have numbers similar to adults.

Abnormal Blood Pressure

This is defined as having blood pressure higher than 120/80 mmHg.

Stages of High Blood Pressure in Adults

Prehypertension Stage
Systolic      120-139
Diastolic     80-89

High Blood Pressure Stage 1
Systolic      140-159
Diastolic     90-99

High Blood Pressure Stage 2
Systolic      160 or higher
Diastolic     100 or higher

People with diabetes or chronic kidney disease should keep their blood pressure below 130/80 mmHg.

Types of High Blood Pressure

There are two main categories of high blood pressure – Primary and Secondary.

Primary or essential high blood pressure is the most common type of high blood pressure. This type of high blood pressure tends to develop over years as a person ages. In 95% of cases there is no specific underlying cause. (8, 9)

Secondary high blood pressure is caused by another medical condition or use of certain medicines. This type usually resolves after the cause is treated or removed. (9)
Research has shown that the remaining 5% of people have a problem with their kidneys or adrenal glands, located at the top of the kidneys. (8)

Isolated Systolic Hypertension

Some people only have high systolic blood pressure. Many older adults have this condition. ISH can cause as much harm as high blood pressure in which both numbers are too high. (10)

Cardiovascular benefits of normal blood pressure extend to lower systolic (105 mmHg) and lower diastolic blood pressure levels (60 mmHg). (1)

Normal levels of both systolic and diastolic blood pressure are particularly important for the efficient function of vital organs such as the heart, brain and kidneys and for overall health and wellbeing. (1)
World Health Organization

Global

2015

7.5 million people a year die from High Blood Pressure.
It is the leading cause of heart disease and strokes.
(11)

Last 20 years, people with High Blood Pressure has doubled.
Billions at increased risk of heart disease, stroke and kidney disease.
(12)

90% increase from 1975 – 2015
594 million to 1.13 billion – increase in number of adults with raised blood pressure. (13)

Hello – can we stop and just re-read that?

90% increase in High Blood Pressure

What on earth is going on?
What is this pressure inside us?
What is this continual force that we are allowing?
What is our lifestyle that is bringing pressure daily?
What is our body trying to tell us?

Where is this pressure coming from?

WHY are we feeling pressure in the first place?
WHY are we not even aware of this?
WHY are there so many more people with high blood pressure?
WHY is learning about blood pressure not a Priority in our lives?

WHY are we the public not demanding more answers?
WHY are we not getting to the root cause of this serious problem?
WHY are we taking the pills without questioning more and more?
WHY are we not taking high blood pressure seriously?

WHY is there so little in the media to support us with our awareness?
WHY is this deadly disease out of control with no signs of stopping?
WHY is nothing out there working to stop this and bring an end?
WHY are we not asking those who have consistent stable blood pressure?

What if our Blood Pressure is affected by every movement we make?
What if our Blood Pressure changes even by our thoughts?
What if our Blood Pressure fluctuates even when we are sleeping?
What if our Blood Pressure changes when we take on other people’s stuff?

What if our Blood Pressure changes when we get angry?
What if our Blood Pressure changes when we get frustrated?
What if our Blood Pressure changes when we get moody?
What if our Blood Pressure changes when we are emotional?

What if our Blood Pressure changes when we hold back what we feel?
What if our Blood Pressure changes when we pretend and do nice?
What if our Blood Pressure changes when we are swearing and shouting?
What if our Blood Pressure changes when we curse and vent at others?

What if our Blood Pressure changes when we are worried about the bills?
What if our Blood Pressure changes when we are speeding on the highway?
What if our Blood Pressure changes when we have that car cut us up?

What if our Blood Pressure changes at Christmas with family?
What if our Blood Pressure changes at the thought of another New Year?
What if our Blood Pressure changes when our Birthday is coming up?

What if our Blood Pressure changes when we get a noisy neighbour?
What if our Blood Pressure changes when we hear bad news?
What if our Blood Pressure changes when we think about the dentist’s chair?
What if our Blood Pressure changes when we get that hospital appointment?

What if our Blood Pressure changes when the politicians don’t listen?
What if our Blood Pressure changes when the talk is about money?
What if our Blood Pressure changes with too much food in our belly?

What if ANY form of fear – big or small, gives rise to our blood pressure?

Over the last forty years the highest worldwide blood pressure levels have shifted from high income countries to low income countries in South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa. (13)

1975 – High Blood Pressure related to affluence.
2016 – High Blood Pressure is a major health issue linked with poverty.

Majid Ezzati, Professor and Senior Author of ‘Worldwide Trends in Blood Pressure from 1975 – 2015’, Imperial College London, School of Public Health (14)

50% of those with high blood pressure live in Asia. (11)

Blood pressure has been persistently high in central and eastern Europe. (13)

19% of all deaths linked to elevated Systolic Blood Pressure – over 115 mmHg. (12)

1990 – 2015

Deaths from elevated Systolic Blood Pressure grew by 1.6%.
107% rate of increase in low to middle countries.
2,844,499 deaths, mainly in high – middle Socio-Demographic Index (SDI) countries.
(12)

2013

Hypertension responsible for –
45% of deaths due to heart disease.
51% of deaths due to stroke.
(15)

2016

66% of those with hypertension are in economically developing countries.

9 out of 10 adults living to 80 years of age will develop hypertension. (4)

Asia

China

2016

Hypertension is a leading cause of premature death in China. (16)

China Kadoorie Bank study found –

32.5% participants had hypertension.
Prevalence increased with age.

1.4% had controlled hypertension.
17.3% had isolated systolic hypertension.

30.5% with hypertension had received a diagnosis from physician.
46.4% with a diagnosis were being treated.
29.6% treated had hypertension controlled (lower than 140/90 mmHg).

13% of participants with hypertension and previous cardiovascular disease had hypertension controlled.

20.1% had stage 1 high blood pressure.
11% had stage 2.
39.5% had prehypertension.

33% of all cardiovascular deaths come from uncontrolled hypertension. (16)

2015

226 million people in China have high blood pressure. (13)

2010

750,000 cardiovascular deaths were attributed to uncontrolled hypertension. (16)

India

2017

India’s largest blood pressure screening campaign started 1 May.
Target –  screen 25 lakh (2,500,000) people by end May 2017.
(17)

18 – 65 year olds – Age group for screening.
Due to ‘faulty lifestyles’ increasingly primarily affecting the young.

260,000 die from High Blood Pressure each year.

13.4% of obese children had hypertension.
Hypertension in obese or overweight children is higher.

Dr. Anupam Sibal – Senior Paediatrician
New Delhi’s Indraprastha Apollo Hospital
(17)

Over the past two years, the number of under 30’s coming to me with high blood pressure has risen by 30% and their lifestyle is a major cause.
Headaches, watery eyes and breathlessness are often the only indications in the early stages. They are usually ignored until they become acute and/or regular.

Dr. Haresh Mehta – Consultant Cardiologist
Mumbai’s SL Raheja Hospital
(17)

The adult hypertension prevalence has shown a drastic increase in the past three decades in urban as well as rural areas.

The following are attributed to Hypertension
16% of Ischemic Heart Disease
21% of Peripheral Vascular Disease
24% Acute Myocardial Infarctions
29% Strokes
(17)

Risk begins in school these days, especially in high school when junk food intake shoots up and activity levels go down as teens spend more time online or just studying. By the time people enter the twenties, if high blood pressure and cholesterol problems haven’t hit them already, this is the time when they are most vulnerable.

We see many youngsters with high blood pressure these days and recently performed an emergency angioplasty – propping open a clogged artery using a stent, on a 28 year old man who was suffering from hypertension that led to a severe heart attack.
Dr. Purshottam Lal – Interventional Cardiologist and Chairman
Metro Group of Hospitals, Delhi-NCR
(17)

Doctors warn against ignoring symptoms even if it is as small as a heavy head.

Many a time, a heavy head is due to high blood pressure. It’s good to get checked as high blood pressure is the biggest silent killer that can damage kidneys, cause blindness, can lead to heart attack and stroke.
Dr. S. Ramakrishnan – Department of Cardiology
All India Institute of Medical Sciences
(17)

2015

199 million people have high blood pressure. (13)

Africa

46% – Africa has highest prevalence of high blood pressure across all World Health Organization regions. (18)

2015

Around 1 in 3 women had high blood pressure in

Niger
Chad
Mali
Burkina Faso
Somalia

These were the top five countries with the highest proportion of women with high blood pressure. (14)

Nigeria

2013  (15)

It cost 1000 Nigerian Naira (US$ 6.36) for a patient to have their blood pressure checked.

People don’t think it is important to spend money and time on their health; they would rather spend more money on luxuries.
Dr. Olayinka Ogunleye

Given the lack of routine blood pressure checks in Nigeria, it is not surprising that the country’s statistics on hypertension are unreliable. 

Most data are outdated speculation based on mathematical models and surveys that are scanty and unrepresentative with low validity.
Dr. Anthony Usoro – National Co-ordinator for Noncommunicable Diseases
Federal Ministry of Health, Abuja

Europe

2015

2 in 5 men had high blood pressure in

Croatia
Latvia
Lithuania
Hungary
Slovenia

These were the top five countries with the highest proportion of men with high blood pressure. (14)

UK

16 million people in the UK have high blood pressure – that’s 1 in 3 adults. (19)

Up to the age of 64 there are higher rates of men with high blood pressure than women.

90% of people with high blood pressure who are receiving treatment are not controlled to 140/90 mmHg.

Most people with high blood pressure who need to take medications, will need to take two or more to ensure that their blood pressure is lowered to a target of 140/85 mmHg. (19)

62,000 unnecessary deaths from stroke and heart attacks due to poor blood pressure control.

People with high blood pressure are three times more likely to develop heart disease and stroke and twice as likely to die from these. (20)

2016

45,000 heart attacks and strokes could be prevented over the next ten years by people having their blood pressure checked.

5 million people who have high blood pressure, but are unaware of it, would be protected.
Blood Pressure UK (21)

USA

75 million American adults have high blood pressure.

1 in 3 American adults has prehypertension.

54% people with high blood pressure have their condition under control.

$46,000,000,000 per year – high blood pressure cost to the nation.

360,000 deaths due to high blood pressure – almost 1,000 deaths per day.

7 out of 10 people having their first heart attack have high blood pressure.

8 out of 10 people having their first stroke have high blood pressure.

7 out of 10 people with chronic heart failure have high blood pressure.

7 in 10 people use medications to treat their high blood pressure.

1 in 5 people don’t know that they have high blood pressure. (22)

Complications and Long Term Effects of High Blood Pressure

Aneurysms
This is when an abnormal bulge forms in the wall of an artery.
Aneurysms develop and grow for years without causing signs or symptoms until they rupture, grow large enough to press on nearby body parts or block blood flow. The signs and symptoms that develop depend on the location of the aneurysm.
(23)

Angina
If coronary arteries narrow, blood doesn’t get to the heart muscle efficiently. When the heart needs to work harder than usual, like when we are walking up a hill, the heart muscle cannot get the oxygen and blood supply that it needs. This causes pain in the chest, known as myocardial ischaemia or angina.
(8)

Chronic Kidney Disease
When blood vessels narrow in the kidneys, possibly causing kidney failure.

Cognitive Changes
Research shows that over time, higher blood pressure numbers can lead to cognitive changes and increased risk of dementia.
Signs and symptoms include memory loss, difficulty finding words and losing focus during conversations.
(8, 23)

Eye Damage
When blood vessels in the eyes burst or bleed.
Signs and symptoms include vision changes or blindness.
(23)

Heart Attack
When the flow of oxygen-rich blood to a section of heart muscle suddenly becomes blocked and the heart does not get oxygen.
The most common warning symptoms of a heart attack are chest pain or discomfort, upper body discomfort and shortness of breath.
(23)

Heart Failure
When the heart cannot pump enough blood to meet the body’s needs.
Common signs and symptoms of heart failure include shortness of breath or trouble breathing, feeling tired and swelling in ankles, feet, legs, abdomen and veins in the neck.
(23)

Irregular Heart Beats
High blood pressure increases the chance of developing a fast irregular heart rhythm called atrial fibrillation. Atrial fibrillation is an important cause of strokes.
(8)

Peripheral Artery Disease
A disease in which plaque builds up in leg arteries and affects blood flow in the legs. When people have symptoms, the most common are pain, cramping, numbness, aching or heaviness in the legs, feet and buttocks after walking or climbing stairs.

Stroke
When the flow of oxygen-rich blood to a portion of the brain is blocked.
The symptoms of a stroke include sudden onset of weakness, paralysis or numbness of the face, arms or legs, trouble speaking or understanding speech and trouble seeing.
(23)
The pressure in the blood vessels can cause blood to leak out into the brain.
This can also cause a stroke.
(1)

Risk Factors for High Blood Pressure

Hereditary – hypertension can run in families

Age – Blood Pressure tends to increase with age and this is partly due to changes in lifestyle where people gain weight and are less active as they get older.

Smoking
Alcohol
Diabetes
Cholesterol
Stress
Diet – salt
Raised Cholesterol
Lack of Exercise
(8)

Main Factors that Contribute to the Development of High Blood Pressure

Social determinants and drivers  

Globalization
Urbanization
Ageing
Income
Education
Housing

Behavioural risk factors

Unhealthy diet
Tobacco use
Physical inactivity
Harmful use of alcohol

Metabolic risk factors

High Blood Pressure

Obesity
Diabetes
Raised blood lipids

Cardiovascular Disease

Heart Attacks
Strokes
Heart Failure

Kidney Disease (1)

So here we have a big list of what is contributing to the chances of getting high blood pressure.

Do the pressures of the long list above get our blood pressure rising?
Do we consider we may have a hand in our blood pressure going up?

Do we ever bother to ask WHY we have tension?
Do we notice when we feel our blood boiling?

Is this list telling us that every bit of our life is an influencing factor?
From when we are kids, where we live, the money we have or don’t have.
Getting old, dodgy diet, what we spend our leisure time on and basically every lifestyle choice we make.

All these components of life contribute to the pressure we feel and we wonder WHY we have Hypertension on the rise.

How the Body Regulates Blood Pressure

Sympathetic Nervous System

There are two systems in the body that are involved in helping us to maintain normal blood pressures in all circumstances. One is the sympathetic nervous system which releases chemicals such as adrenaline and noradrenaline; these can both open or vasodilate in microscopic arterial and narrow them by vasoconstriction, as required, depending on which parts of our body need to be ready for action.

This system comes into operation to enable us to respond in a crisis by concentrating our physical resources where they are needed to help us survive a perceived threat. This means shutting down non-essential functions – such as digestion – for the duration of the crisis to prepare us to fight or run away.

For early humans, this was essential when life was full of physical danger but for most people today, the system is likely to be triggered by emotional or psychological stress rather than by actual life-threatening situations most of the time.

As a result of its narrowing effect on small blood vessels, this process can play a part in causing hypertension. Drugs that act on this system, for example, the alpha blockers and beta blockers, can therefore be used to control it.

Renin-Angiotensin System

This is the other important system.
Renin is an enzyme produced by the kidneys.
This activates the hormone angiotensin II.
Angiotensin II makes blood vessels constrict.
Some drugs block angiotensin – angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs). They can help lower blood pressure.
(8)

Calcium

When calcium concentrations rise, the smooth muscle cells in arterioles (microscopic blood vessels) contract. This makes it harder for the heart to pump blood through the arterioles. People with hypertension have higher calcium levels in the smooth muscle cells. Calcium enters the cells through calcium channels. (8)

High Blood Pressure Medicines

Until the 1950’s there was almost nothing that doctors could do to reduce blood pressure. People with severe hypertension became unwell with strokes, heart and kidney failure. (8)

During the early 1960’s antihypertensive drugs became available that did lower blood pressure and did save lives.

The development of antihypertensive drugs with minimal side effects and their immense benefits in terms of prevention of heart attacks and strokes has been one of the biggest advances in medical care since World War II. It is at least comparable with the revolution that was achieved with the development of effective antibiotics. (8)

Medicines work in different ways to stop or slow some of the body’s functions that cause high blood pressure. Medicines used to lower blood pressure include: (24)

Diuretics

Water or fluid pills to flush excess sodium from the body to reduce the amount of fluid in the blood and helps to lower blood pressure.
Diuretics are often used with other high blood pressure medicines, sometimes in one combined pill.

Beta Blockers

To help the heart beat slower and with less force. As a result, the heart pumps less blood through the blood vessels, which can help to lower blood pressure. (24)

Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitors

Angiotensin-II is a hormone that narrows blood vessels, increasing blood pressure.
ACE converts Angiotensin I to Angiotensin II. ACE inhibitors block this process, which stops the production of Angiotensin II, lowering blood pressure.

Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers (ARBs)

Block angiotensin II hormone from binding with receptors in the blood vessels.
When angiotensin II is blocked, the blood vessels do not constrict or narrow, which can lower blood pressure.

Calcium Channel Blockers

Keep calcium from entering the muscle cells of the heart and blood vessels.
This allows blood vessels to relax, which can lower blood pressure.

Alpha Blockers

Reduce nerve impulses that tighten blood vessels.
This allows blood to flow more freely, causing blood pressure to go down.

Alpha-Beta Blockers

Reduce nerve impulses the same way alpha blockers do.
They also slow the heartbeat and as a result blood pressure goes down.

Central Acting Agents

Act in the brain to decrease nerve signals that narrow blood vessels, which can lower blood pressure.

Vasodilators

Relax the muscles in blood vessel walls, which can lower blood pressure.

To lower and control blood pressure, many people take two or more medicines. (24)

Can we just stop and think about this with our common sense hat on?

We have been living in a way that has been causing our blood pressure to rise for over 60 years.

The only reason this disease has not killed us is because we have drugs and more drugs doing things that control our rising blood pressure.

Does this mean that we have become reliant on finding ways to better ourselves, but we have not got to the root cause of WHY we get hypertension in the first place?

Does this mean that we will take the drugs and not worry about the side effects as long as we can continue living the way we always live?

Do we want to know that some of the medicines actually stop or slow down our body’s natural functions?

What are we introducing to our body by way of drugs that may give rise to other symptoms?

Is this offering us a true answer to high blood pressure?

Is a drug that slows our heartbeat really the answer?

Dangers of Lowering High Blood Pressure with Medication

The Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention – Government Funded Trial
5 year Study
9,300 people with high blood pressure and high risk of heart attack
Medication given to reduce their blood pressure
50% aimed to lower systolic pressure to 120
50% had goal of 140

Study stopped after 3 years due to dramatic results
100 developed heart failure
65 people died of those trying to get down to a systolic of 140
37 died trying to get down to systolic 120
62 developed heart failure

Significant downsides

To get blood pressure to 120 on average three blood pressure medications taken.
This led to double the instances of serious side effects, including some that required emergency care at a hospital, such as kidney failure, dangerously low blood pressure and imbalances in potassium or sodium blood levels.
(25)

Hello – can we go back and re-read this?

WHY would any Government fund such a trial?
WHY did they all forget their common sense hat?
WHY does society think this is Intelligent research?
WHY do we give so much credit to this type of research?

WHY are our Government authorising such a study?
WHY are we not demanding more evidence from those who are super steady?
WHY are we doing this like a band aid answer for high blood pressure?
WHY are we desperate for solutions to get our nations’ blood pressure down?

WHY are we willing to give our trial participants 3 tablets, just to reduce pressure?
WHY are we ignoring our common sense that this has serious side effects?
WHY are we blocking and stopping natural processes in the body, as it is harmfull?
WHY are we surprised when the study is stopped because of damaging results?
WHY are we becoming goal orientated when it comes to large trials of this kind?
WHY are we putting pressure on our governments to give us answers?
WHY are we so unwilling to see if there is another way?
WHY are we all not making our blood pressure a Priority in our lives?

What is the cost to human life when we conduct studies of this kind?
What is the pressure to get results to control something that is out of control?

WHY are there no studies funded for those who have consistently normal blood pressure?

Are we ready to consider that how we are choosing to live every day, maybe contributing to our high blood pressure?

Are we ready to take Responsibility for our lifestyle choices?

Lifestyle Changes Recommended for the Reduction of High Blood Pressure

Losing Weight
More Exercise
Quit Smoking
Cut back on Sodium
Limit Alcohol
(25)

Are the above what most of us would call common sense?
Do we already know this stuff but can’t be bothered to change?

Are our bad habits killing us on some level?
Are we in comfort mode with our ill lifestyle choices?

Is limiting a scientific proven poison called Alcohol the answer?
Should we be truthfully saying No Alcohol?

Is losing weight for many of us not a priority and never will be?

Are we open to mis-interpretation as we all have our own ideas about the word ‘Exercise’?

Are we ready to stop our microwave dinners, fast foods and takeaways as they all contain lots of salt?

How many of us fancy swapping our salty chips for leafy greens, as they help reduce our blood pressure?

Salt has for many years been the number 1 public enemy when it comes to blood pressure.
But what if salt is not the main culprit?
According to a new study, sugar could be the biggest cause of high blood pressure.
High fructose corn syrup being one to watch out for.
Drinking 24 ounces of soda can jump our blood pressure.
If 25% of our daily diet comes from added sugars, we triple our chances of cardiovascular disease compared to people whose intake is less than 10%.
WebMD tells us the best way to avoid this is to stay away from processed foods and eat a ‘heart-healthy’ diet.
(26)

What is this actually telling us?
What is this spelling out to us about our awareness?

Could it be possible that our body recognises salt and sugar as the same?
Could it be possible that salt and sugar are not natural for our body?
Could it be possible that these substances alter our metabolism?

How can this go unnoticed in our body?
How come we do not know about something going on inside our own body?

Is this telling us we are dis-connected and cannot feel our own rise in pressure?

Are we complacent because there are no significant symptoms?
Are we ignoring some of our symptoms?
Are we living in a way that does not allow us to know about this ‘silent killer’?
Are we not taking it seriously that this ‘silent killer’ is affecting our heart?

Are blood pressure measuring machines the only way for us to know that we have high blood pressure?

Are we waiting for our ticker to stop functioning before we take any action?
Are we quite happy taking pills for the rest of our living days?
Are we ok knowing that the medics will do their job so we can continue?
Are we ever going to question our behaviour that maybe causing our unnatural state of blood pressure?

WHY do they tell us NOT to smoke, drink alcohol or have a caffeine drink before a blood pressure test?

Did we know we can use an APP?

Are we going to be at the mercy of our mobile phone app to tell us what is going on inside our body?

How reliable or realistic is this in our opinion?

Are we willing to consider connecting to our body to feel what is actually going on for us?

Are we ready to ponder on WHY we need gadgets to tell us our internal state of being?

Are we open to think about how we are living every day that may give rise to hypertension?

WHY are they suggesting we uncross our legs and support our back by paying attention to our posture before taking a blood pressure reading? (27)

Is this telling us that just by simply sitting in a more relaxed state we can benefit?
Is this telling us that by crossing our legs there will be a change in our blood pressure?
Is this telling us that supporting our back when we sit down gives a more accurate reading?

WHY are we asked not to talk when our blood pressure is being monitored?

Is this telling us that even talking can affect the pressure of our blood?
Is this all common sense stuff that is making some sense?

Could it be possible that by taking a moment to rest by sitting down with our back supported, uncrossing our legs and not talking we could have some internal change to our blood pressure?

What if we took note of this basic stuff and paid attention and applied this to everyday life?

WHY are we not offering this advice as some basic tips that need to be applied every single day as exposure to persistent stress is also a risk factor for hypertension? (1)

Have we heard of white coat hypertension?

“White coat hypertension” is where just being in the doctor’s office can cause a person’s blood pressure to increase – this can give an inaccurate reading and not be a true reflection of a person’s blood pressure.

WHY does our blood pressure increase when we are visiting the doc?

Could we agree we have this ‘white coat hypertension’ going on in life with others who don’t wear a white coat like the boss, the scary neighbour and the bigwigs in the world, who we fear because of what they might say to us?

Dear World

What goes on in daily life that puts PRESSURE on us?

Could it be possible that the following list is the real life pressure we feel?

Pressure to get the kids in the right school
Pressure to get the children to school
Pressure to attend school events
Pressure to be a good parent
Pressure to help them with their homework

Pressure to get good grades consistently
Pressure to be good at soccer and academics
Pressure to hand in assignments on time
Pressure to pass the exams with top marks

Pressure to get into University
Pressure to get the qualification so we can earn more money
Pressure to get letters before and after our name

Pressure to settle down and do what the world is doing
Pressure to get married like everyone does
Pressure to find the money for the big wedding
Pressure to get into the tight dress for the big day

Pressure to have an outrageous stag do our mates remember
Pressure to get the spectacular honeymoon destination
Pressure to have sex because that’s what others do
Pressure to have the baby as the clock is ticking

Pressure to fit in so we don’t stand out
Pressure to have the perfect body
Pressure to get the hair right on a bad hair day
Pressure to use that gym membership

Pressure to eat the right foods
Pressure to go food shopping because we have to
Pressure to give up stuff our doctor has warned us about

Pressure to get the task done that you promised someone
Pressure to meet deadlines non stop
Pressure to be a superwoman multi-tasking, – running the house and a job
Pressure to add more to our to do lists

Pressure to get through loads of emails
Pressure to get the new job application done in work time
Pressure to get the job that will give us more recognition

Pressure to say the right thing to colleagues
Pressure to please the boss as it affects our appraisal
Pressure to get the train for work as we overslept
Pressure to attend boring meetings that are part of our job

Pressure to drive the right car that gets us noticed
Pressure to have the house of our dreams
Pressure to go on fancy holidays so others see we are doing ok
Pressure to bring in more money so we can spend more

Pressure to go out and socialise as that’s expected
Pressure to look good in front of friends
Pressure to be famous so the world knows who we are

Pressure to pump up the lies so we can impress others
Pressure to follow fashion as everyone else is doing that
Pressure to be the first to do this or that so others hear about it from us

Pressure to have the best website and get noticed
Pressure to be all over social media and act like everything is great
Pressure to get the latest App to be in the know

Pressure to let others see that we are super human
Pressure to deal with our stress levels but have no time
Pressure to find ways to calm our stressfull lives

Pressure to return phone calls when we know it’s a waste of time
Pressure to end the phone conversation as we are running late
Pressure to please the parents
Pressure to ring the parents when it’s the same old stuff
Pressure to go and visit relatives in hospital

Pressure to be nice and polite as that’s what we got told
Pressure to be a non-moody partner, dad and brother
Pressure to be a happy smiley mother, daughter, sister
Pressure to not let anyone find out about our secrets and vices

Pressure to book the next holiday while the rates are cheap
Pressure to get unrealistic goals done before going away
Pressure to pack the suitcase with all the ‘just in case’ stuff
Pressure to find the passport as our flight is tomorrow
Pressure to get the jabs as we left it too late

Pressure to be like those who live in another country
Pressure to live in another country as we think it is a better life
Pressure to be westernised when we live in the east

Pressure to look young when we start the ageing process
Pressure to make sure we don’t end up in a nursing home

Pressure Pressure Pressure everyday as we keep taking on more and more.
Even more Pressure because we have no steady days
Super daily Pressure as we go about fitting everything in
Enormous Pressure to cram in what life is offering us so we don’t miss out

Dear World

Have we got Hypertension with no real cure after 60+ years because we keep on moving away from our natural state?

Have we got our lifestyle so advanced today that our body is not keeping up with it all?

Are our bodies designed in a way to work in harmony but what changes this are our daily choices that disturb it?

Are we all looking in the wrong direction for the answers to this global epidemic?

Are we ready for the simple Truth that there may be another way that delivers a steady body with no pressure with what daily life brings?

Could this be the answer and could it be this SIMPLE?

References

(1) A Global Brief on Hypertension. World Health Day 2013. World Health Organization. (p.7, p.11, p.17, p.18).  Retrieved May 14, 2017 from http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/79059/1/WHO_DCO_WHD_2013.2_eng.pdf?ua=1

(2) World Hypertension Day. International Society of Hypertension. Retrieved May 9, 2017 from
http://ish-world.com/public/world-hypertension-day.htm

(3) Background. International Society of Hypertension. Retrieved May 9, 2017 from
http://ish-world.com/about/about-us.htm

(4) ISH 50 Years. International Society of Hypertension. Youtube. Retrieved May 9, 2017 from
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1xT_lRMreUE

(5) Concise Oxford English Dictionary – Twelfth Edition. Oxford University Press. 2011

(6) (2016, November 30). High Blood Pressure Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs). Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Retrieved May 14, 2017 from https://www.cdc.gov/bloodpressure/faqs.htm

(7) (n.d). What is Blood Pressure? Blood Pressure UK. Retrieved May 14, 2017 from
http://www.bloodpressureuk.org/BloodPressureandyou/Thebasics/Bloodpressure

(8) Beevers, D.G. (n.d.) Understanding Blood Pressure. Family Doctor Publications Limited in association with the British Medical Association (p.5, p.32, p.34, p.36, p.39 – 42, p.85, p.107)

(9) (2015, September 10). Description of High Blood Pressure. National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NIH). Retrieved May 14, 2017 from
https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/hbp

(10) (2015, September 10). Other Names for High Blood Pressure. National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NIH). Retrieved May 14, 2017 from
https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/hbp/names

(11) (2017, February 5). News Releases. 1 Billion People Worldwide Now Have High Blood Pressure. Blood Pressure UK. Retrieved May 14, 2017 from
http://www.bloodpressureuk.org/mediacentre/Newsreleases/1billionpeopleworldwidenowhavehighbloodpressure

(12) (n.d). Elevated Blood Pressure is the Top Risk for Health Loss Worldwide. Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME). Retrieved May 14, 2017 from
http://www.healthdata.org/announcement/elevated-blood-pressure-top-risk-health-loss-worldwide

(13) (2016, November 15). Worldwide Trends in Blood Pressure from 1975 to 2015: a Pooled Analysis of 1479 Population-Based Measurement Studies with 19.1 Million Participants. The Lancet. Retrieved May 14, 2017 from
http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(16)31919-5/fulltext

(14) Wighton, K. (2016, November 15). High Blood Pressure Affects 1.13 Billion People, Says New Study. Imperial College London. Retrieved May 14, 2017 from
http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/newsandeventspggrp/imperialcollege/newssummary/news_15-11-2016-18-22-42

(15) (2013, April). Nigerians Wake Up to High Blood Pressure. Bulletin of the World Health Organization. World Health Organization. Retrieved May 14, 2017 from
http://www.who.int/bulletin/volumes/91/4/13-020413/en/

(16) Lewington, S., Lacey B., & Clarke, R. et al (2016, April). The Burden of Hypertension and Associated Risk for Cardiovascular Mortality in China. The JAMA Network. Retrieved May 14, 2017 from
http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/2500028

(17) Kaul, R. & Matta, A. (2017, May 13). Hypertension Kills on the Sly. Hindustan Times. Retrieved May 14, 2017 from
http://www.hindustantimes.com/india-news/hypertension-kills-on-the-sly/story-UmA0RHo67SSUkDwCJoemVL.html

(18) (2017). Situation and Trends. Raised Blood Pressure. World Health Organization. Retrieved May 15, 2017 from
http://www.who.int/gho/ncd/risk_factors/blood_pressure_prevalence_text/en/

(19) (n.d). High Blood Pressure: Facts and Figures. Blood Pressure UK. Retrieved May 15, 2017 from
http://www.bloodpressureuk.org/microsites/kyn/Home/Media/Factsandfigures 

(20) (n.d). Blood Pressure Facts and Figures. Blood Pressure UK. Retrieved May 15, 2017 from
http://www.bloodpressureuk.org/mediacentre/Factsandfigures

(21) (2016, September 12). Pressure Checks Could Protect 5 Million. Metro

(22) (2016, November 30). High Blood Pressure Facts. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Retrieved May 15, 2017 from
https://www.cdc.gov/bloodpressure/facts.htm

(23) (2015, September 10). What Are the Signs, Symptoms and Complications of High Blood Pressure? National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NIH). Retrieved May 15, 2017 from
https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/hbp/signs#Complications

(24) (2015, September 10). How is High Blood Pressure Treated? National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NIH). Retrieved May 15, 2017 from
https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/hbp/treatment

(25) Mitchell, S. (2016, January 17). Do the New Blood Pressure Guidelines Affect Me? Consumer Reports (CR). Retrieved May 16, 2017 from
http://www.consumerreports.org/health/do-the-new-blood-pressure-guidelines-affect-me/

(26) (n.d). Sugar vs Salt: What’s Worse for Blood Pressure? Retrieved May 16, 2017 from
http://www.webmd.com/hypertension-high-blood-pressure/video/sugar-vs-salt-whats-worse-for-blood-pressure

(27) (2017, April 19). May Measurement Month: How to Take a Manual Blood Pressure Measurement. International Society of Hypertension. Youtube. Retrieved May 16, 2017 from
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eD44Zazy9K

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Comments 18

  1. By Getting Back to Basics with Simple Living Global I have learned that to reverse my various health issues, I did not need to ADD anything to me or my life; I simply needed to REMOVE or stop what I was doing/choosing that was not contributing to my body and beings ability to run harmoniously.

    Solutions had only delayed me getting to the root of my issues and medications, though sometimes needed in the short term, when used as the end-all ‘fix’ they added the complication of side effects to my body without having addressed or healed the cause of my ills.

  2. What a detailed and insightful blog. I know many people who suffer from hypertension (including a 12 year old!). A few years ago I could have been one of those statistics. The pressures you list are an eye opener. There are definitely a few on this list that I have indulged in over the years. Present day and the author of this blog has shown and inspired me to Live Simply. And what a weight off my shoulders (literally!) that has been.

    People often refer to Life as “a Rat Race”. But is it really? Why do we need to put Pressure on ourself and our bodies to keep up with the latest gadget, buy a big house or be in the best job etc. Why cant we LIVE WHO WE REALLY ARE instead of being someone we are not. To me that is No Pressure!

    Brilliant blog which I will definitely go back to.

  3. Why is it that we are so ready to add things to our lives to fix something that is not working, rather then look at what we are already doing?

    It is because we do want to take responsibility for our choices and have to look at what we are doing in our lives that we do not want to look at.

    Rather then looking at how we are living our lives, we go to the Internet or the doctors to figure out what we can take to fix the problem.

    So we want to change but not change our lives too much.

    Simple Living Global has presented a way of living that involves making small changes.
    With true commitment and consistency, our bodies respond to these changes by saying “yes this is working, I want more!”
    This makes it easy to continue with the process.
    It supports us to start trusting ourselves again, that we do know what is good for us.

    Simple Living Global – Back to Basics Program has totally transformed my life.
    I am 66 and I literally feel and look younger than I did 10 years ago.

  4. Hypertension was simply not on my radar before reading this blog. I have to admit I wasn’t even interested in it.

    Yet so many of us are living with this. Living with the pressure building up inside.

    I can really relate to it.

  5. I realise I have experience of hypertension.

    Just this week, I had been away from work and home and was feeling super-steady and settled in my body. In the morning and on the way to work, checking my emails and messages and feeling the onslaught that was coming, I could feel my chest getting tight, my heart getting out of rhythm and my breathing getting short.

    It is amazing to know, having read this blog, what was going on in my blood vessels – that the external stimulus/pressure and my reaction to it was having a physiological affect.

    I took my attention to my breathing and to staying very focused on my steps and how I was moving. The affect was amazing. Yes, I could still feel the tension, but the physical symptoms lessened and the steadiness came back.

    This blog highlights the enormous pressure we put ourselves under and asks us to look at the part we play in that.

    For me, my experience this week confirms what this blog presents and that we can do much more about it that we are lead to or let ourselves believe today.

  6. Again another blog that points to the fact that our lifestyle choices are affecting our health.

    I feel this is something we all know, but for some reason we do not want to take responsibility for not being responsible for our own lives.

    Why is it that it is so hard to do things that will improve the quality of of our lives? How is it that we are the only species that can do things to ourselves that hurt us? And continue to do these things for years.

    These are important questions to ask, and we need to start asking questions like these, because these are the questions our world are avoiding.

    Modern medicine has made amazing advances, but because of the continuing rise in diseases like high blood pressure, I feel like they are missing something.

    Serge Benhayon and Universal Medicine has presented a way of living that I feel deals with what is missing. I have been living this way for the last 6 years and it has transformed my life.

    I am 66, I do not take any medication any more, working a full time job and loving it. I look and feel younger then 15 years ago. And there are many people with the same experience.

    The key is ask for the real truth, and do not settle for less, because everything is possible.

  7. An interesting read. What stood out to me is the amount of ‘blockers’ that are in the listed medication for Hypertension. It seems to me blocking the bodies natural process if it is done in a fix it or cure it way, chemically forcing the body to go against expressing what is an imbalance for it, is simply a plaster to cover what is really going on, allowing the same momentum to continue.

    Your list of pressures makes it clear to understand why hypertension is so rife and the statistics are so.. yet if we were to consider how we are living as a possible contributor to this condition I’m sure looking at it this way and making simple changes to our day to day life would make a significant difference to this condition.

    I have not had hypertension but can definitely tick quite a few of your pressure list that I have felt stressed over, in the past and some still now, and can see that if this was an ongoing thing how it would affect my body if I wasn’t taking great care of myself and changing how I deal with situations that I once would have felt very stressed over.

  8. In this blog we are asked this very personal question:
    “Are our bodies designed in a way to work in harmony but what changes this are our daily choices that disturb it?” 

    Over the past six years my body has answered this question for me.
    I now have more harmony in my body (and life) as a direct result of making daily choices that support my body where my previous life choices had been very unsupportive and effected me in more ways than I wanted to see.

    So my answer is a big fat ‘YES, it is our daily choices that disturb the bodies design to work in a harmonious way’.

  9. https://healthminute.org/2017/05/high-blood-pressure-in-early-and-middle-age-can-increase-heart-disease-danger/

    18 May 2017

    This news story headlines – High Blood pressure in early and middle age can increase heart disease danger.

    A recent study published in the BMJ, researchers led by Boston University find that early start of high blood pressure can increase the risk of death from heart disease.

    The researchers used data from Framingham Heart Study, is a long-term, ongoing cardiovascular cohort study on residents of the town of Framingham, Massachusetts.

    The study began in 1948 with 5,209 adults and is now on its third generation of participants.

    All the ins and outs are on this link but to laser it we can say that the researchers concluded that early start of hypertension in parents was strongly associated with hypertension in children.

    How often do we come across a study that is so old and ongoing?
    What is this telling us about hypertension stuff?
    What is this spelling out to us about how we are living?

    If we read this blog it would be easy to join the dots because it is simple – we have daily pressures and this list is long and there are even more we could add.
    Our body does not operate and work to our racy pressure pace and so it has to speed up and do what we want while we pile on the pressure, giving it no thought or attention of how it will cope.

    Enter stress, anxiety and a crazy day and we wonder why we get high blood pressure.
    Our heart is having to do more than it signed up for because we demand it to do so.

    If we carry on making no real changes to support our body, then chances are we are going to increase the danger of heart disease, simply because we have not bothered to do anything about the high blood pressure by changing our lifestyle.

    Is this common sense?
    Is anyone getting this?
    Have we created this dis-ease in our body and is it us who can get out of it if we choose to?

  10. As a health professional this is simply the best article that I have ever read on hypertension because it gets to the heart of the matter.

    We are living with an enormous amount of pressure which is coming from within us and from outside of us and we are mostly ignoring this fact by deliberately dulling ourselves with all sorts of detractions.
    This article asks us to STOP and consider that there may be another way to live that does not produce tension and pressure. Surely this is worth investigating?

  11. A 90% increase of Hypertension from 1975 to 2015, with this whopping statistic surely it is time we stopped and asked ourselves.. is how we are living affecting our health?

  12. I was diagnosed with high blood pressure 12 years ago and was prescribed drugs that would bring it down. I chose not to take the drugs, understanding that the high levels of stress in my life was a big part of the cause. I decided to take responsibility for how I was living, somehow I knew that was the long term answer. It took a while but slowly my blood pressure came down.

    It was a very empowering experience, that has helped me understand that I have the knowledge to deal with everything that happens in my life. Listening to my body is the key.
    My body is constantly healing me in many ways, getting me back on track. It knows what I need to do in any situation.

    My way of living today has allowed me to reconnect to the wisdom of my body.
    It is what I have been ignoring most of my life. This way of life makes so much sense, because it is how we were meant to live.

    I am 66 and am working full time again and loving it. I feel and look 10 years younger. It is a miracle, but I am responsible for this miracle just by taking more responsibility for my life.

  13. Thank you Simple Living Global for this in-depth analysis of a topic that isn’t really given the exposure it needs.

    The statistics in this blog are quite scary when we consider that this is just one illness/disease.

    In the USA the cost of this one illness/disease alone, costs a staggering $46 billion and it is very easy to see why, with all the other illnesses and diseases that mankind suffer from, health services around the world are under so much pressure.

    One statistic that really stood out was the fact that from 1975-2015 there is a 90% increase in the amount of people that have high blood pressure.

    Another interesting point was the fact that those having high blood pressure had shifted from being linked to affluence in 1975 to being linked to poverty in 2016.

    I can understand the reduction in high blood pressure in affluent people could be down to a better awareness of health and what foods would be more beneficial, but why is the increase of high blood pressure being linked to poverty?

    Poverty has been around for aeons, so why in the last 40 years has it jumped so high for those living in poverty?

    Could it be possible that it is simply just linked to our lifestyle?

    Is it possible that technology has created an ‘instant must have’ in us and that is putting a pressure on us that we are not even aware of?

    Most people these days has access to at least a mobile phone.

    Is it possible our constant desire to be on social media, waiting for that next ping that says you have an email, that next text or whatsapp message, that next photo on Facebook, is all adding to the pressure?

    Is it possible that our consistent demand for the latest gadgets, the latest in-thing, the latest fashion, the bigger, better, faster, keeping up with the Jones’s, is putting more pressure on us?

    Is it possible that the pressure is mounting because we are only interested in satisfying our need on the outside?

    If we are the creators of this self-inflicted pressure bubble, isn’t it possible that we can start to burst this bubble?

    Is it possible that lowering our indulgences and making life more about other people, we could actually lower our blood pressure?

    Could it be possible, as this blog asks, there is a different way we can live that brings very little or no pressure at all?

  14. Hypertension is about not feeling like we have what we need. Looking outside of ourselves for answers. Thinking that the more we have the better our life will be. Not trusting that we are enough.

    This way of living creates a tension in our bodies, that I feel is a major contributor to hypertension.

    Simple Living Global’s Back to Basics program has supported me to change the way I have been living, which has gradually allowed me to regain the level of trust in myself, that I have everything I need.

    One of the many benefits of living like this, is I do not have hypertension any more.

  15. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/09/11/nhs-plan-could-see-blood-pressure-checks-supermarket-tills/
    The Telegraph – 11 September 2017

    Is this the UK’s 911 news story that requires our immediate attention?

    A silent killer called High Blood Pressure which is now at the point where the NHS are coming up with ‘radical plans aimed at preventing almost 25,000 heart attacks and strokes.

    Under NHS proposals, local planners will be encouraged to find “creative ways” to carry out checks on those in middle age – instead of relying on them to turn up at GP’s.

    Are our “creative ways” going to stop this silent killer?
    Are we aware of how serious this must really be if we are looking at supermarket check outs to offer this service?

    Is our blood pressure going to rise even more and add to our stress levels if we find out things are not great?
    Is our blood pressure simply going to go up because we are rushing around the supermarket, not really paying any attention to our true health and well being and consuming foods that really don’t support us?

    Is this blog worth a re-read as it is spelling out so much to us that may give us some clues as to WHY we may have high blood pressure in the first place?

    Are we ready to allow presenters like the author of this blog, who has the GP confirm ‘perfect blood pressure’ consistently, to show us there is another way to live and it does come down to lifestyle choices?

    Are those who have stable steady blood pressure the ones we need to start researching, as they have the answers, which are not creative but just simple, practical and real with the word RESPONSIBILITY at the core of their daily choices?

  16. https://healthminute.org/2017/09/lowering-blood-pressure-intensively-can-benefit-patients-with-chronic-kidney-disease/
    Health Minute – 5 September 2017

    A recent clinical trial is saying that lowering blood pressure can reduce CKD (chronic kidney disease) patients’ risks of dying prematurely or developing cardiovascular disease.

    The highlight of this news story is this –
    “In people with CKD, lowering systolic blood pressure beyond the conventional goal reduced the risks of heart disease and death…”
    Dr. Alfred K. Cheung, MD – University of Utah

    If we stick our common sense hat on and keep it simple, we all can say that our blood pressure needs to be stable to reduce the risks of other dis-eases in our body.

    Reading the blog and what it is presenting may give us a deeper insight with the questions being asked as to WHY we have raised blood pressure in the first place. We have heard it over and over again like a boring old record, that lifestyle choices play a big part and this means it is preventable.

    How many more research studies are we looking for, waiting for and asking for when the answers are right under our nose?

    Are we missing something here in the Intelligence department or are we acting like we just don’t get it because it means we can continue living with zero responsibility?

    Does this lack of responsibility actually suit us, if we are being honest?

  17. https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/news/article/253/research_suggests_middle-aged_women_with_high_blood_pressure_could_be_at_increased_risk_of_dementia
    Alzheimer’s Society – 4 October 2017

    Study published in the medical journal Neurology is saying that women who develop high blood pressure in their 30s and 40s were 73% more likely to develop dementia later in life.

    This is serious and we can go on and ask for more and more studies and this is how our world operates – keep researching and finding out more.

    But what if something is missing?
    What if we are missing the point?
    What if we need to look deeply at lifestyle choices?
    What if we studied women in their 20s to see if a pattern of behaviour emerges that gives rise to high blood pressure?
    What if we all started conversations with the questions this blog is presenting?
    What if there was another way?
    http://simplelivingglobal.com/is-there-another-way/
    What if the author of this blog needs to be studied because her blood pressure has been stable and the medics have called it “perfect” for past few years?
    What if we as individuals need to take a dose of honesty about how we are living?
    What if we did not wait for the next research study but apply common sense to our life?
    What if our choices got us the high blood pressure and our new choices reversed that?
    What if anything is possible if we are willing to take Responsibility in a true way going forward with our life?
    What if we made our body a priority in life to not harm, abuse or disregard it in anyway?

  18. As a world do we still continue to push our body to the point we can no longer function in life.
    What if there was a different way to Live without the need to trash our body every time.

    The author of this blog has certainly shown me there is a way to support our body with the most simple practical tips; like going to bed early, moving your body in a way that does not push it to the extreme and many many more.

    A great blog and one that I will always come back to.

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